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BTEC Higher National Certificate or Diploma in Healthcare Practice (Healthcare Management)

About the course

1: Why choose a BTEC Higher National qualification in Healthcare Practice (formerly Health and Social Care)?

The purpose of BTEC Higher National qualifications in Healthcare Practice is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals able to meet the demands of employers in the healthcare sector and adapt to a constantly changing world. BTEC Higher Nationals include a Level 4 Certificate (HNC) and a Level 5 Diploma (HND). The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them.

BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to help students secure the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed to succeed in the workplace. They represent the latest in professional standards and provide opportunities for students to develop behaviours for work, for example by undertaking a group project, or responding to a client brief.

At the same time the BTEC Higher Nationals are intended to keep doors open for future study should a student wish to progress further in their education after their level 5 study. They do this by allowing space for the development of higher education study skills, such as the ability to research.

Key Information

Starting Dates January / April / September
Mode of Study Full-time
Duration HNC – One year /HND – Two years
Awarding Body Pearson
Award Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in
Healthcare Practice (Healthcare Management)
Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in
Healthcare Practice (Healthcare Management)
Price Per Year Full Time £6,000/year
* STUDENT LOAN AVAILABLE *
2: Who are these qualifications for?

The BTEC HNC/ HND in Healthcare Practice is aimed at you if you want to continue your education through applied learning! Higher Nationals provide a wide-ranging study of the health and social care sector and are designed for students who wish to pursue or advance their career in healthcare practice or related fields.

In addition to the knowledge, understanding and skills that underpin the study of the health and social care sector, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Healthcare Practice give students experience of the breadth and depth of the sector that will prepare them for further study or training.

3: Who awards the qualifications?

The BTEC Higher National qualifications are awarded by Pearson and The City College works in partnership with this organisation to deliver the programme. As the awarding organisation, Pearson has approved The City College to offer a variety of HND qualifications. The College’s management team is then responsible for ensuring that the quality of the provision offered meets Pearson’s exacting conditions and standards.

Quality is monitored regularly through visits from Pearson’s External Examiners and a regular Pearson Annual Management Review.

4: Qualification numbers

The Ofqual Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) qualification numbers are as follows:

  • Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Healthcare Practice: 603/2293/7
  • Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Healthcare Practice: 603/2294/9
5: Why choose BTEC?

BTECs are work-related qualifications for students taking their first steps into employment, or for those already in employment and seeking career development opportunities. BTECs provide progression into the workplace either directly or via study at university and are also designed to meet the needs of employers. Therefore, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals are widely recognised by industry and higher education as the principal vocational qualification at Levels 4 and 5.

6: Aims of the Level 4 HNC and Level 5 HND in Healthcare Practice

The Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Healthcare Practice offers students a broad introduction to the subject area via a mandatory core of learning, while allowing for the acquisition of skills and experience through specialist pathways and the selection of optional units across a range of occupationally relevant subjects at Level 4. This effectively builds underpinning core and specialist skills while preparing the student for further subject specialisation at Level 5. Students will gain a wide range of sector knowledge tied to practical skills gained in evidence-based practice, personal research, self-study, directed study and workplace learning and experience.

Holders of the Level 4 HNC will be able to demonstrate sound knowledge of the basic concepts, values and principles of healthcare practice, and the skills to perform effectively as a support worker in a number of different settings in the healthcare sector. They will be able to communicate accurately and appropriately and they will have the behaviours and qualities needed for employment that requires some degree of personal responsibility. They will have developed a range of transferable skills to ensure effective team working, independent initiatives, organisational competence and problem-solving strategies. They will be adaptable and flexible in their approach to healthcare practice, show resilience under pressure, and meet challenging targets within a given resource.

Holders of the Level 5 HND will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in their field of study and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. They will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. They will be able to perform effectively in their chosen field and will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

7: Programme Structure

The programme at Level 4 and Level 5 follows the ‘Healthcare Management’ pathway. The normal timescale for achieving a Level 4 HNC by full-time study is one-year. The normal timescale for achieving a Level 5 HND by full-time study is two-years. Progression to Year 2 of the programme is dependent on satisfactory completion of Year 1.

The one-year Level 4 HNC:

  • Requires successful completion of 7 units
  • Mixes 4 mandatory core, 2 mandatory specialist, and 1 specialist/ optional unit, each with a value of 15 credits except ‘Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice’ which is 30 credits (120 total)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 1200 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 480 hours.

The two-year Level 5 HND:

  • Requires successful completion of a further 7 units (therefore 14 in total)
  • Mixes 2 mandatory core, 3 mandatory specialist, and 2 specialist/ optional units, each with a value of 15 credits except ‘Innovation and Improvement through Action Research’ which is 30 credits (240 total minimum)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 2400 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 960 hours.

TQT is an estimate of the total amount of time that could reasonably be expected to be required for a student to achieve and demonstrate the achievement of the level of attainment necessary for the award of a qualification. It can include, for example, guided learning, independent and unsupervised research/ learning, unsupervised coursework, watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar, and unsupervised work-based learning.

GLH are defined as the time when a tutor is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. Guided Learning includes any supervised assessment activity; this includes invigilated examination and observed assessment and observed work-based practice.

The 240 credits achieved by successful completion of the HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a healthcare practice related honours degree at a UK university (see section 8 below).

8: What is studied and how is it timetabled and assessed?

The academic year is divided into three terms and in each term you will normally be timetabled to study 2-3 units. You will usually be timetabled for at least three days per week and it must be noted that the timetable changes from term-to-term as the programme develops and units are completed.

A variety of forms of assessment evidence will be used, suited to the type of learning outcomes being assessed. Some units, for example, require a practical demonstration of skills while others require students to carry out their own research and analysis, working independently or as part of a team.

Methods of assessment may include, for example, writing a report or essay, recording an interview or role play, examination or in-class tests, giving a presentation with assessor questioning, making a PowerPoint presentation, creating academic posters, displays or leaflets, or keeping a reflective journal.

Year 1

Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in
Healthcare Practice (Healthcare Management)
Unit Unit Title Unit level Unit credit
Core unit
Mandatory
1
Law, Policy and Ethical Practice in Health and Social Care
Unit 1: Law, Policy and Ethical Practice in Health and Social Care
Introduction

Health and social care practitioners are regulated by, and must adhere to, a range of law and policy when working within the most common settings of health trusts, primary care and other public authority settings. Even those working in voluntary, non-profit and private organisations will require a sound understanding of law and policy in order to practice proficiently, safely, ethically and legally. This unit develops students’ knowledge and appreciation of the need for them to be thoroughly informed about relevant law and policy. Further to this, the unit presents opportunities for students to apply relevant law and policy in practice settings, both actual and realistic, and to consider the place of codes of practice and ethics in their day-to-day work.
The Learning Outcomes in this unit build progressively from core underpinning legal principles and perspectives to national and international law on key topics such as rights and equality, and subject-specific law and policy, within health and care practice. Students will investigate the legal and policy framework related to health and care practice in different settings, leading to opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge and skills through targeted assignments.
Students will evaluate the relative weight of, for example, statute law, case law, codes of practice and organisational policy, and will develop an understanding of how to access advice and guidance if unclear about a path to follow. Students will consider how legal and ethical frameworks are interpreted and applied to different settings within the community, hospitals and other areas of health and care. Students will apply this learning to explore the relevance of statute, case law, codes of practice and organisational policy to their own and others’ practice.
The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will support students in understanding how and when to access advice and guidance on legal issues relating to health, care and support service practice and provision. On completion of this unit, students will have acquired a good working knowledge of the way that legislation supports the development of policy and underpins ethical practice in health and care settings. This will support progression in employment and continuing higher education in areas related to health and social care.


Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explore the legal framework within which health and social care practitioners operate
2 Describe key legislation, national and organisational policy of fundamental importance to the health, care or support service practitioner
3 Interpret the law in relation to key ethical and professional Practice Themes in health and social care
4 Apply law and policy in line with regulatory and ethical requirements in a relevant practice setting.

4 15
2
Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice
Unit 2: Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice
Introduction

Reflecting on our daily activities is an automatic process: it is part of human nature, and something conducted often unconsciously. Reflective practice involves selfobservation and evaluation with the goal of refining practice on an ongoing basis. Reflecting on what we do is a fundamental skill that helps us to develop, improve personally and professionally. It is an active, dynamic process that also helps develop confidence in our ability to perform our daily working practice and to become proactive, professional leaders. The art of reflection is a tool that students will carry with them through and beyond their educational journeys and is a requisite for many roles in the sector. Developing the necessary skills early helps students to be prepared for their career progression pathways.
This unit is intended to run alongside other units in this qualification in order that students may gather evidence to compile a Professional Learning and Development Portfolio (PLAD) which captures evidence of learning and development against a framework of Practice Themes which forms the essential core running through the unit. The unit aims to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for students to reflect on their own and others’ daily practice and improve students’ own practice and professional development.
Students will firstly develop an understanding of the purpose and importance of continually reviewing their own practice and professional development through an exploration of the benefits and issues associated with reviewing practice. They will then develop their knowledge and skills of theoretical models and other techniques needed to support them in carrying out active, dynamic, action-based, real-time reflection. Students will record their evidence in the PLAD which will comprise learning from this and other units on an ongoing basis. Finally, students will evaluate their reflective journeys and the effectiveness of the PLAD in supporting their ongoing personal and professional development.
On successful completion of this unit, students will have gained the necessary knowledge and skills to complete a professional development portfolio that records evidence of a continuous cycle of reflection and improvement of knowledge and skills and be able to plan for their future career pathway


Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explain the role of reflection in health and social care practice
2 Use the Practice Themes as a framework for reflection
3 Demonstrate active, ongoing, critical reflection of learning experiences
4 Assess the overall success of own reflective journey and consider future career pathway.

4 30
3
Supporting the Individual Journey through Integrated Health and Social Care
Unit 3: Supporting the Individual Journey through Integrated Health and Social Care
Introduction

The integration of the Health and Social Care sub-sectors is important in terms of being able to provide services for the wellbeing of individuals, and to meet the increasing demands of a growing and ageing population with increasingly complex needs. Students working in health will need to be aware of integrated care pathways: a multidisciplinary approach towards anticipated care that enables an individual with identified needs to move progressively through their journey and experience positive outcomes.
The aim of this unit is to develop students’ understanding of an individual’s right to being involved in their own care and develop students’ skills in promoting this right when working with individuals. This right is, in many cases, enshrined in law and in the fundamental standards of care. It is a critical element of person-centred care and leads to improved and often more cost-effective outcomes. Students will explore the importance of working relationships within multidisciplinary settings and the impact on the individual.
Students will investigate the importance of professionals being able to communicate and co-ordinate care with the individual and multidisciplinary teams for and on behalf the individual. In addition, students will recognise their own responsibilities in understanding seamless services that support the individual through their integrated pathway of care, considering personalised care plans – written with individuals for themselves, families and carers and with their wishes and preferences clearly identified and monitored. In this unit, students will be expected to research new models of care, funding availability, legislative frameworks and policy initiatives that contribute to high-quality person-centred care.
On completion of this unit, students will have expanded their knowledge and understanding of multidisciplinary working within health, care and support services. Students will have developed their transferable communication skills to improve care and better outcomes for individuals within their chosen role. This will also provide opportunities for them to consider future career pathways in health, care or support services.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Examine the health, care and support services available to an individual requiring multidisciplinary care
2 Assess an individual’s capacity to identify their own needs
3 Describe the impact of own relationship with the individual and multidisciplinary teams involved in the delivery of the care pathway
4 Demonstrate the need for person-centred communication in implementing person-centred plans.

4 15
4
Fundamentals of Evidence-based Practice (Pearson-set Project)
Unit 4: Fundamentals of Evidence-based Practice (Pearson-set Project)
Introduction

Evidence-based practice in health and social care involves taking a systematic approach to examining a range of evidence in order to answer key questions of relevance to the sector. The basis of evidence-based practice is research. In health and social care, research is conducted for a number of reasons for example, to find prevalence or incidence of disease, to assess quality of life or patient satisfaction. Research has global relevance and plays a significant role in influencing the development of high-quality provision, supporting a high-functioning integrated workforce and promoting the health and wellbeing of those who use health, care services.
Working in health and social care provides unique opportunities for practitioners to make a difference, developing the skills and knowledge to conduct research is fundamental in order to support quality practice, influence positive change and promote a highly-skilled workforce.
The aim of this unit is to develop students’ knowledge and skills to understand the purpose and process of research in health and social care particularly in relation to promoting integrated approaches to care. Students will carry out a literature review on a topic drawn from the Practice Themes aimed at quality improvement within wider health, care or support service practice. Students will learn how to source current literature and assess the reliability and validity of sources to be able to construct an argument that leads to a proposal for a potential research study. Throughout this process, students will learn how they can dynamically influence changes and improvements within the health and social care sector. The unit will develop students’ skills in understanding the steps they need to take to complete a literature review, academic conventions for presenting literature and how it forms the rationale for a personal research project.
On completion of this unit, students will have developed the pre-requisite skills needed to design a proposal that either extends from their literature review or highlights a further potential area of research. Possessing the necessary skills for conducting quality personal research that leads to evidence-based practice, will enhance students’ academic skills, professionalism and employment opportunities within the health and social care sector.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explain the role of research for evidence-based practice in health and social care
2 Conduct a review of key literature relating to a research topic towards improvements in care practice
3 Develop a project proposal using evidence-based practice
4 Examine the value of the literature review process in influencing positive change in health, care or support service provision.

4 15
Specialist Unit
Mandatory
10
Developing Operational Management Skills for Healthcare Practice
Unit 10: Developing Operational Management Skills for Healthcare Practice
Introduction

The healthcare industry is a dynamic changing environment and a key aspect of working in healthcare practices is the ability to embrace change and consider new and innovative ways to do more with less. The effective operational manager focuses on processes that manage and monitor all aspects at work within their area of healthcare practice while driving innovation and change.
To be able to be an effective operational manager this unit will develop students’ understanding of, and the skills required to, manage people effectively in order to get the best out of them to develop a highly organised, structured health service that delivers efficient functionality and provision of health services. This unit will enable students to apply theoretical perspectives applicable to operational management in healthcare to aspects of practice, through exploring the way they manage people and influence others and develop new ideas, processes and strategies within their area of practice.
This unit will provide students with the opportunity to develop their personal and professional skills. It is particularly useful for students who wish to progress to supervisory or lower management areas in healthcare practice.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe the competencies required of an operational manager in healthcare practice
2. Apply theories of leadership to operational management in healthcare practice
3. Demonstrate leadership skills managing a team in healthcare practice
4. Produce a plan to improve an area of provision in healthcare practice.

4 15
17
Effective Reporting and Record-keeping in Health and Social Care Services
Unit 17: Effective Reporting and Record-keeping in Health and Social Care Services
Introduction

With the use of technology becoming more widespread, information is increasingly easy to obtain, store and retrieve. However, it is also becoming easy for the wrong people to have access to information. With increasing emphasis on accuracy and digital safety and taking into consideration the sensitive information recorded and used in healthcare settings, practitioners responsible for handling data or other information are expected to take the initiative on managing records appropriately and efficiently, reporting accurately to line managers.
This unit is intended to introduce students to the process of reporting and recording information in health, care or support services; it will allow them to recognise the legal requirements and the regulatory body recommendations when using paper or computers to store information, as well as the correct methods of disposing of records. This unit will enable students to recognise the importance of accurate recording and appropriate sharing of information, and be able to keep and maintain records appropriately in their workplace.
Students will be expected to use appropriate methods to record and store information from their workplace and to follow data protection principles to use and dispose of the information on completion of tasks.
Students completing this unit will have developed the knowledge and skills to manage day-to-day recording and reporting which are essential to being an effective care practitioner and manager.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Describe the legal and regulatory aspects of reporting and record-keeping in a care setting
2 Explore the internal and external recording requirements in a care setting
3 Review the use of technology in reporting and recording service user care
4 Demonstrate how to keep and maintain records in a care setting in line with national and local policies and appropriate legislation.

4 15
Plus ONE specialist/ optional unit from the list given below (chosen by the College)
Plus ONE specialist/
optional unit
(chosen by the
College)
5
Health Education in Action
Unit 5: Health Education in Action
Introduction

Health education involves both giving information and training individuals and communities to bring about better health outcomes. This role is a key feature of the role of nurses and other healthcare practitioners. Additionally, health education is also a key focus for the government. The financial budget for health education has significantly increased in recent years due to its significant benefits to health outcomes. This unit will support the development of students’ knowledge, understanding and skills regarding providing and supporting the provision of health education to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals accessing healthcare services.
This unit will develop students’ understanding of the factors that impact upon health and the methods that are used to identify health inequalities at a local level. Students will also develop their understanding of the relationship between health beliefs and illness. Students will be able to assess how health beliefs can influence communication between healthcare practitioners and clients, and how to address barriers that may occur as a result.
Theoretical models using health education to bring about behaviour change will be examined and students will be able to use one such model to implement a health education initiative. They will also be able to understand and apply methods used to evaluate health education initiatives.
This unit will be of interest to those individuals wishing to pursue a career as a nurse, health advisor and in other healthcare-related professions where they will need to take part in health education initiatives.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Examine the factors influencing health status
2 Investigate the impact of health beliefs on wellbeing and illness
3 Explore the relationship between theoretical models of health education and health behaviour
4 Implement a local health education initiative using a theoretical model of health education

4 15
6
Supporting Dementia Care
Unit 6: Supporting Dementia Care
Introduction

The term ‘dementia’ describes the different brain disorders that trigger a loss or deterioration of brain function. These changes are often small to start with, but often they become so severe they affect daily life. A person with dementia may also experience changes in their mood or behaviour. These conditions are all usually progressive and eventually severe. The World Health Organisation (WHO) suggest the number of people living with dementia worldwide is estimated at 35.6 million. This number is anticipated to double by 2030 and more than triple by 2050.
The WHO and Alzheimer\'s Disease International highlight dementia as a global public health priority. Their joint report on dementia makes it clear that dementia presents a significant challenge to society in terms of the provision of appropriate care services and support. To address this, it is vital to ensure that the health and social care workforce of tomorrow is knowledgeable, competent and able to provide the specialist care and support needed for individuals experiencing dementia, their families and loved ones.
This unit introduces students to the specialist area of dementia care and the demands which can be faced when managing a person-centred service. The aim of this unit is to explore theories relating to the causes, signs and symptoms, therapies and treatments associated with dementia. The unit will enable students to identify strategies that will facilitate a person-centred ethos in the delivery of effective care services that address the needs of people living with dementia. The unit will also enable students to be aware of the challenges faced when delivering services which are ensure the rights and choices of people with dementia are upheld.
On completion of this unit, students will have developed the knowledge and skills to be involved in the delivery of services which meet the wide and varied needs of individuals with dementia.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Describe the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of dementia
2 Explain factors that can impact on interactions and communication with individuals with dementia
3 Contribute to the provision of dementia care services which are underpinned by a person-centred approach
4 Reflect on the challenges involved in implementing services which maximise the rights and choices of individuals with dementia.

4 15
8
Addressing Health Inequalities
Unit 8: Addressing Health Inequalities
Introduction

Despite significant advances in public health in the UK over the past century there remains inequalities in health status across the country. Public health addresses all areas relating to the health and wellbeing of our communities. It covers an extremely wide remit and addresses issues such as air pollution, obesity, climate change and smoking, to name but a few. These are issues that affect not only the individual but wider populations as well.
Public health is monitored by government groups who develop influential legislation aimed at improving the health of the nation. Public health remains the responsibility of all and is significantly influenced by pressure groups across society. The development of strategies aimed at reduction and prevention of disease is targeted at different levels across communities.
In this unit, students will explore current public health issues and will develop understanding of the factors that influence differences in health status across populations. Students will analyse different types and levels of intervention in health protections. Health protection and the reduction of disease is an important public health role and students will review how healthcare professionals prevent and control the spread of disease.
This unit will support progression to more senior roles with allied health professionals working in public health and can also support progression to continuing higher education in public health and health promotion-related degrees.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explore the factors that contribute to current public health issues in own nation
2 Explain the different levels of public health intervention
3 Review national strategies aimed at reduction or prevention of disease
4 Explore the role of healthcare professionals in preventing and controlling the spread of disease

4 15
11
Changing Perspectives in Public Health
Unit 11: Changing Perspectives in Public Health
Introduction

The development of the concept of public health has its roots in the Victorian times. However, even prior to this era other measures were developed in keeping communities healthy including the development of sewage systems in Roman times and in early Egyptian medical practice up to 5000 years ago. Public health has evolved with time with an emphasis on the leading health issues of any community at any given time. Significant epidemiological factors have influenced the practice of public health.
Public health focuses on promoting improvements in attitudes to health and lifestyle based upon individual responsibility. There has been a shift in the perspectives of public health linked changing understanding and beliefs of what health means. Health improvement measures are often guided by societal attitudes and changes to health are influenced by government policies that legislate for measures aimed at limiting risk behaviours such as the banning of smoking in public places and increased tax revenues on alcohol.
In this unit, students will consider the evolution of public health over time with particular focus on public health research and development in policies and strategic planning. Students will review the impact of recent public health measures and how changed understanding of health has influenced responses to those measures. It is important that healthcare support staff have a sound understanding of the significance of the role of public health regulatory bodies and skills and knowledge frameworks in promoting health improvements across communities.
Completion of this unit will support progression to more senior roles in public health and to continuing higher education study in subjects related to health research and improvement.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Review the timeline of the development of public health from historical antecedents through to contemporary practice
2 Examine the influence of public health research and policy on current practice in public health
3 Contribute to the implementation of an aspect of current public health strategy within own local community.
4 Explore the roles of public health regulatory bodies in promoting practice and strategies aimed at health improvement.

4 15
12
Supporting Independent Living
Unit 12: Supporting Independent Living
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to explore the principle of supported independent living and provide students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to implement effective programmes of care for individuals living in their own homes or other domiciliary care environments.
There are a number of individuals who require some level of support to live independently such as individuals with physical or learning disabilities and some older adults. Healthcare practitioners can be a vital source of support to these individuals, providing physical, emotional, cognitive and social support and enabling individuals to maintain their independence.
Individuals requiring support may have many of the skills and abilities to manage independence in a number of aspects of their daily living but may require additional support in with key tasks such as shopping, cooking, personal care and getting out and about. The role of the healthcare worker is to support and develop skills for daily living and to provide personalised packages of care to enable this independence and promote equality of opportunity. This support will ultimately have an impact upon the individual’s emotional and social wellbeing and will contribute to reducing emergency use of health and care services in the community.
Students taking this unit will require a period of work placement in an independent living environment. Upon completion of this unit, students will have further developed their skills and knowledge in supporting individuals in an independent living setting. They will have been involved in wider multidisciplinary care processes towards developing and facilitating appropriate care for individuals living independently. The unit will support students in developing their role in health, care and support services or to continue on to higher education in a related discipline.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explain the benefits of supporting independent living for the individual, family and local service provision
2 Explore the barriers to independent living and strategies to overcome these
3 Contribute to the implementation of a programme of care for individuals who live independently
4 Examine the role of the healthcare worker as a part of a multidisciplinary team in supporting independent living.

4 15
13
Supporting Individuals with Specific Needs
Unit 13: Supporting Individuals with Specific Needs
Introduction

Healthcare practitioners encounter individuals with specific needs and often these needs, for example learning disability, may be an inherent part of an individual’s condition and presentation. Individuals with specific needs often present with physical and emotional disabilities across a spectrum of disorders or are those who are considered at high risk of developing specific needs as a result of illness or injury. Such conditions may impact on an individual’s ability to interpret information and they may not be able to function effectively, either cognitively and socially.
In this unit, students will consider the factors that shape the contemporary development of the service provision available for individuals with specific needs. By reviewing their practice, the student will ensure the provision of effective and holistic care to individuals with specific needs. The student will reflect upon the challenges of promoting an inclusive and dignity -based service to individuals that promotes empowerment, independence and safety.
Upon completion of this unit, students will have developed the skills and awareness in supporting the care and individuality of individuals with specific needs which can include a myriad of health conditions affecting physical, emotional social and intellectual support needs. Students will be able to demonstrate ability to respond to challenging behaviours using positive behaviour management and to work with individuals with a level of sensitivity, compassion, understanding and awareness.
This unit supports progression to senior care roles in different health, care and support services. It will also support progression to nursing and allied care professions in carrying out roles in supporting and enabling individuals with specific needs. The unit will provide a clear foundation to developing wider understanding of the demands of service provision as well as the significant role of carers in this field of practice.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Assess the factors that impact upon services for individuals with specific needs
2 Review own practice in providing support to individuals with specific needs
3 Assess local service provision for the support of individuals with specific needs
4 Reflect upon the challenges of promoting person-centred service provision for individuals with specific needs.

4 15
14
Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Health
Unit 14: Sociological and Psychological Perspectives on Health
Introduction

The work of sociologists and psychologists have had a significant impact on healthcare practice. Sociologists investigate the interaction between society and health. Psychologists explore the relationship among psychological, cultural, behavioural factors and health. Together they have informed our understanding of health and illness, contributed to major changes in healthcare policy and been useful in developing behaviour modification therapies and improving the health status of individuals. Understanding how these perspectives are used to inform their practice, deepens students’ approach to caring for individuals and supports the development of skills and behaviours for effective professional practice.
On completion of this unit, students will be able to develop their understanding of both sociological and psychological factors that affect health and illness, and the related theoretical frameworks that underpin healthcare practice. Students will have the opportunity to observe and report practical examples of how sociological and psychological concepts are considered when planning support for service users. The unit will engage students in the assessment of the implications of both perspectives on current healthcare policies. Furthermore, students will be able to explore a range of applications of the psychological perspectives and understand how these can enhance health and wellbeing.
This unit will inform developing healthcare professionals of the importance of sociological and psychological concepts in improving health status of service users. This unit is particularly suited to those interested in pursuing a career in health promotion, public health and counselling.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explain a range of sociological perspectives on health and illness
2 Describe a range of psychological perspectives on health and illness
3 Explore the influence of sociological and psychological perspectives on healthcare provision
4 Assess how psychological theories are applied to elicit behaviour change in healthcare settings.

4 15
15
Healthcare Technology in Practice
Unit 15: Healthcare Technology in Practice
Introduction

Advances in information and other technologies have had a significant impact on work practices in the healthcare sector. These technological advances have many benefits including, early diagnosis and detection, reduction in invasive procedures and consistent measuring of vital signs towards more effective and efficient healthcare.
Students will explore types of medical technology used in healthcare contexts, for example for diagnostic purposes, invasive procedures or life support. They will also consider the range of assistive technology which can be used to improve the wellbeing and independence of individuals using services. In addition, students will examine the guidelines and legislation related to the correct use, storage and decontamination of equipment.
The aim of this unit is to develop students’ understanding of the range of technologies used in healthcare practice and the subsequent implications for people using services. It will encourage the development of students’ own skills in using technology during their practice in healthcare settings.
The unit introduces students to the application of the range of information and communication technology used in healthcare practice which enable the acquisition of skills that can be utilised in a variety of health, care and support services, supporting career mobility and progression on to degree ‘top-up’ programmes.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explore the uses of diagnostic technology in healthcare
2 Assess how monitoring and treatment technology in used in healthcare
3 Investigate the use of assistive technology in health, care or support services
4 Demonstrate the safe use and storage of medical and assistive technology.

4 15
16
Supporting Adults in Residential Care
Unit 16: Supporting Adults in Residential Care
Introduction

Adult residential care has changed in its approach, and is constantly evolving to ensure it keeps up with market forces. Each setting must be responsive, diverse and able to provide high-quality, personalised care and support that meets the needs of people, regardless of who pays for care.
Accessing residential care can be a frightening and lonely process for individuals. They might have made the decision to move for themselves, or the decision might have been made for them, in their best interests. Assessing what individuals need is the first stage of getting the right care provision in place. An accurate assessment has to put the individual at the heart of the process, involving them, and relevant others, in decisions about their care needs.
This unit is intended to introduce students to the residential care sector and how practitioners work with individuals, their carers and other professionals to ensure care needs are met through person-centred practice underpinned by principles and values. Through this approach practitioners can help ensure the individual’s voice is heard and their needs are identified and met. In this unit, students will explore how the residential care sector supports individuals and involves them in assessment to ensure that care promotes an individual’s health and wellbeing effectively.
This unit develops understanding of the values and principles that underpin the practice of those who work in residential care.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Describe the functions of the adult residential care sector
2 Assess the impact of legislation, regulation, codes of practice and standards on service delivery in adult residential care
3 Explain how inclusive and person-centred practice is applied in adult residential care
4 Contribute to the provision of adult residential care services which is underpinned by best practice.

4 15

 

Year 2

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in
Healthcare Practice (Healthcare Management)
Unit Unit Title Unit level Unit credit
Core unit
Mandatory
18
Innovation and Improvement through Action Research (Pearson-set Project)
Unit 18: Innovation and Improvement through Action Research (Pearson-set Project)
Introduction

Why conduct research?’ It is an important and interesting question that should be considered when looking at ways to improve healthcare service provision. Some who embark on the research process find it can be daunting and see it as an obstacle to be overcome and swept aside as quickly as possible. Yet research can be a motivating and engaging experience, particularly for the researcher who is passionate about making a difference. Research can have a positive impact on local practice and policy, as well as promoting and informing global health programmes. Refining and using effective research skills and methods is key to being able to produce high-quality research that can contribute to developing a richer understanding of a phenomenon, driving improvements in public health and in healthcare as a whole.
The aim of this unit is to develop student’s research skills further to be able to carry out an independent piece of action research using human participants to contribute to service improvement. Students will make use of the Practice Themes in order to identify a suitable research project or extend a proposed study devised at level 4. Students will firstly develop a deeper understanding of the types of research conducted in public health and develop their research skills further to carry out a research study using their own research questions. Students will then go on to design their research methodology and carry out a piece of action research and produce findings to a range of audiences.
By the end of this unit students will be able to evaluate their research journey and its impact on their own practice and provision as well as its significance in contributing to wider public health service improvement. Students will be able to evaluate the success of their research and make recommendations for future research that extends or deepens understanding further.
*Please refer to the accompanying Pearson-set Assignment Guide and the Theme Release document for further support and guidance on the delivery of the Pearson-set unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Review the role of research in strategies to improve health and wellbeing
2 Develop a methodological framework for action research into health and wellbeing improvement
3 Carry out action research towards improvements in health and wellbeing
4 Examine the impact of research findings with regard to service improvement and own professional development.

5 30
19
Reflective Approaches in Implementing Person-centred Practice
Unit 19: Reflective Approaches in Implementing Person-centred Practice
Introduction

Reflective practice is used throughout the healthcare profession as a means to improving the practitioner’s skills, reviewing how they have dealt with situations that have occurred and identified areas that need further development. Overall this enables the practitioner to provide a high-quality service and adopt a more professional approach to the user of services. Being a reflective practitioner is key to lifelong learning and development for working in health, care and support service professions. Reflective practice works to ensure that a high-quality service is offered to the users of services and the effective practitioner identifies areas for development and where they can share good practice.
This unit builds on learning from Unit 2: Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice. It provides students with an opportunity to further develop their skills as reflective practitioners. The evidence for the unit will be based on theoretical considerations as well as practice within the workplace. It requires students to bring together their classroom and workplace learning across their programme, demonstrating their professional development using reflective approaches. Learning in the workplace will be supplemented with wider understanding and knowledge from all parts of the course.
Through this unit, students will be supported to take responsibility for their own learning, demonstrate their capacity to continuously learn and grow, reflect on their own practice and encourage others to develop their practice. It enables students to have a greater understanding of person-centred care, the legal and ethical framework under which practitioners operate, and further develop the skills required to develop them as reflective healthcare practitioners throughout their learning and career in the health and social care sector.
As students will be reflecting using examples from real practice in their workplace setting, it is essential that students respect the confidentiality of information used within this unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Promote a holistic approach to person-centred practice
2 Review current policies, legislation and regulations in relation to effective person-centred practice
3 Reflect on own practice within health, care and support settings
4 Explore ways to develop own professional skills and behaviours in relation to health, care or support service provision.

5 15
Specialist Unit
Mandatory
23
Managing Quality in Care Environments
Unit 23: Managing Quality in Care Environments
Introduction

Every organisation should strive for excellence in service and in health and social care, the process of continuous improvement to safety, wellbeing and satisfaction is a hallmark of effective service provision. Staff and service users should be reassured that managers recognise the benefits of improvement to the quality of provision, and the impact of the individual on the overall success of the organisation. Being able to able to understand and implement continuous improvement measures is part of the manager’s role in care service provision. Further, increasing demands on care settings to improve quality of service have identified the importance of all staff understanding the different perspectives on, and methods of, achieving quality on a daily basis.
This unit will enable students to develop their knowledge of these differing perspectives, to review the requirements of external regulatory bodies and to analyse these in relation to the needs of patients, customers, staff and other internal stakeholders. Students will explore the methods used to assess different quality markers as well as strategies for managing service quality in order to maintain continuous improvement and positive outcomes. Further, students will have the opportunity to use this knowledge to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate a small-scale quality improvement initiative in their own work setting.
A manager in care settings would be expected to be a driving force in terms of quality improvement. This unit will provide students with the knowledge and skills that employers will expect their managers to bring to the setting.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Assess the impact legislation and policy has on measuring and monitoring quality of practice in a health and social care
2 Discuss the impact that improving quality has on different individuals in a care setting
3 Explore quality improvement requirements in a care setting
4 Plan and monitor improvements to quality.

5 15
25
Facilitating Change in Healthcare Environments
Unit 25: Facilitating Change in Healthcare Environments
Introduction

Change management is so much more than to make something different. From the investigation as to whether change is necessary through to the exploration of team dynamics, leadership, barriers to change, motivation and planning for change, involvement of the multidisciplinary team with the implementation of change and, finally, results evaluation, with the potential to re-plan future strategy. The one constant within the health service is change; from health departments and agencies which define the shape of training, education, skill and the competence of the healthcare workforce, through to a number of local initiatives and strategies that require implementation.
The aim of this unit is for the student to recognise the different components of change management, and to develop the skills to be able to facilitate the identification, development, piloting of and evaluation of a change management initiative in a healthcare context. Students will develop their knowledge of the theoretical aspects of change management in the application of an identified change initiative.
Topics included in this unit are the theories behind change management within the health service, barriers to change the student may experience, especially where ingrained culture may prove difficult to navigate, decision-making structures made in partnership with organisational policy, and impact on key stakeholders, e.g. allied health professionals and patients. Finally, students will explore how change itself may emerge and how reflection can be used as a building block for future work.
On completing this unit, the student will have had the opportunity to design and initiate a change management plan within their own organisation that will support their career progression in healthcare. Transferable skills the student will develop through completing this unit include project and staff management, customer service, enhanced communication skills and the ability to reflect on own practice.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Discuss factors that have driven recent changes in the healthcare sector
2 Discuss the components of change management within a change management initiative in healthcare provision
3 Implement own small-scale change management plan
4 Assess the effectiveness of a change management plan.

5 15
29
Human Resource Management for Healthcare
Unit 29: Human Resource Management for Healthcare
Introduction

Recruitment and retention of staff is an extremely important element of the healthcare sector. Those with responsibility for this need to have the knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in the recruitment and management of staff in the healthcare workplace., They need to recognise their responsibilities in relation to their own developmental needs as well as those they are responsible for.
This unit will allow students to practise valuable staff interviewing skills as well as giving the opportunity to demonstrate effective recruitment practice in a healthcare setting in preparation for their role in managing staff. Students will be required to investigate the recruitment of staff, including the relevant legal and policy frameworks, as well as relating the process to various advisory documents providing guidance on recruitment in a healthcare settings. They will also review their workplace supervision and appraisal practices and make recommendations for improvement.
Students will investigate how Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is used in the workplace as well as examining their role in supporting, coaching or mentoring staff and the purpose and process of providing feedback. Students will also explore the use of development plans to allow for identification of staff training requirements and investigate their own management training needs.
The skills and understanding gained in this unit will help students to manage workplace human resources in a healthcare-related environment at their relevant level.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Discuss the processes involved in the recruitment of staff relevant to own setting
2 Review how staff are monitored and supported on a regular basis
3 Recognise the legal and ethical responsibilities of human resource management
4 Plan for own learning requirements relevant to managing staff.

5 15
Plus TWO specialist/ optional units from the list given below (chosen by the College)
Plus TWO specialist/
optional units
(chosen by the
College)
26
Supporting Team and Partnership Working Across Health and Care Services
Unit 26: Supporting Team and Partnership Working Across Health and Care Services
Introduction

It is important for organisations to work together to enable access to services to be provided for the continuation of care and the well- being for the users of services. This will help to ensure that high-quality provision is offered which is efficient. It is also important for an integrated service to be applied when the authorities are dealing with safeguarding and protection to ensure that the health, social services, and police are aware of children and adults that may need to be supported and if they are at risk.
The aim of this unit is to help students understand the difference between the function of a manager and the role of a leader, and be able to apply this understanding in supporting the development of effective teams.
Students will consider the leadership and management characteristics, behaviours and traits which enable effective and seamless integrated care provision when working in partnership in teams across health, care and support service organisations. In addition, students will investigate how partnership working is applied across different services and give examples of where good practice is being applied.
On completion of this unit, students will have demonstrated that they can work in a leadership role as part of a team and will have developed their knowledge and understanding of how partnership working benefits the users of services and organisations across health, care and support service provision. The leadership qualities that will be enhanced during the unit will help students to gain confidence and understanding when working as part of a team, or as a leader, which will support employment opportunities in the healthcare sector and progress into healthcare-related degree programmes.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Differentiate between the role of a leader and the function of a manager
2 Discuss the role of partnership working across health, care and support services
3 Explore the outcomes of positive partnership working across health, care and support services
4 Examine own contributions to working as part of a team.

5 15
27
Social Policy in Public Health
Unit 27: Social Policy in Public Health
Introduction

Social policy is integral to the function of health and care services, it involves the legislation, guidelines and expectations regarding conduct of professionals and services that are responsible for securing the welfare of individuals within a society. In public health, social policy is specifically focused on policies that the government and other agencies representing the population determine are the vision for improving and maintaining the health of the nation.
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to a range of legislation, policy and codes of professional conduct related to public health and the impact these have on different populations. This will lead on to students appraising current social policy and how policy can aid in the promotion of health for a population within their own practice area.
Topics included in this unit are social, political and economic processes, health and wellbeing inequalities, partnership working, strategies to improve health outcomes and policy within own practice area.
On successful completion of this unit, students will have an insight into the origins of social policy documents within their own practice area. This will enhance their ability to reflect upon social and public health factors which are fundamental within a career in healthcare and for future study.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Discuss the historical context of social policy governing public health practice
2 Examine social policy initiatives in public health
3 Carry out a review of social policy in relation to own area of practice
4 Reflect on the impact of social policy as a driver to improve outcomes in public health.

5 15
32
Team and Individual Leadership: Coaching and Mentoring Others
Unit 32: Team and Individual Leadership: Coaching and Mentoring Others
Introduction

The purpose of this unit is to enable students to understand the role and contribution of mentorship in health and social care, which is to support the personal development and lifelong learning of staff. Mentorship is achieved through effective leadership, mentoring and/or coaching. Health and social care workers need to be able to differentiate between team and individual leadership, mentoring and coaching, and know how to apply these in their own practice.
This unit will support students’ understanding of mentoring as establishing and developing learning relationships that support people to take charge of their own development. The unit will enable students to develop their confidence and motivation, through self-reflection and improved understanding, and their interpersonal skills. Further, this unit aims to develop students’ practice in being able to lead, mentor and coach others in health and social care-related environments.
Students will review relevant theories, approaches and principles of leadership, mentoring and coaching, as well as considering the purposes and benefits of mentoring in health and social care practice. Further, students will plan, implement and review a period of mentoring in their own workplace.
The focus on personal and professional development through developing others will support students’ progress through lifelong learning and increase their capacity to develop as well-rounded practitioners in the sector. The learning gained from this unit can also provide the foundation for undertaking further professional qualifications in coaching.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Review theories and principles of team and individual leadership, mentoring and coaching in health and social care
2 Explore how mentorship, through mentoring and coaching practices, can benefit individuals and organisations in care environments
3 Apply mentoring and coaching techniques to support mentorship of individuals in care environments
4 Review own leadership and mentoring practice in a care environment.

5 15
35
Project Management for Healthcare
Unit 35: Project Management for Healthcare
Introduction

This unit will provide students with the opportunity to gain understanding and develop skills relating to project management principles, methodologies, tools and techniques. This includes undertaking independent research, managing and implementing a project. They will develop confidence and abilities in decisionmaking, problem-solving, consequential thinking, critical analysis and research activities within their chosen field. Further, they will be able to critically assess key concepts, systems, processes, and practices within a work-based context to determine appropriate outcomes and solutions, present evidence and make recommendations in an appropriate, clear and understandable way.
Project briefs will be set by the centres in partnership with participating organisations. The projects must allow flexibility for student input in project design, and must enable students to explore and examine relevant and current topics or other key aspects of business within the healthcare environment.
In completing this unit, students will have developed skills in project management, supporting continuing further education in healthcare related management degrees and enhancing employment opportunities in supervisory or junior management roles in healthcare.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Apply theories of project management to management systems and practices in own work setting
2 Implement a planned small-scale project relevant to own workplace experience
3 Produce an end of project evaluation report, taking into account audience and stakeholders
4 Critically reflect on own performance and learning within the project management process.

5 15

 

9: Compulsory work experience/placement requirements

The Level 4 HNC in Healthcare Practice requires at least 225 hours of work experience/ placement in health and/ or social care settings and a ‘Professional Learning and Development’ portfolio (PLAD), including reflective accounts, to be completed.

The Level 5 HND in Healthcare Practice requires at least 450 hours of work experience/ placement in health and/ or social care settings and a ‘Professional Learning and Development’ portfolio (PLAD), including reflective accounts, to be completed over the two-year period of the qualification.

Students can undertake placement in more than one setting, providing they meet the minimum requirement for types of setting as indicated above.

All work hours should be evidenced in the individual student’s ‘Practical Learning, Assessment and Development Portfolio’ (PLAD), which will be given at the start of the course.

In order to work in the care sector, you would require Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance and you will be responsible for arranging this. There will be a charge to obtain DBS clearance to be met by yourself or your employer. You will not get DBS clearance if you have a criminal record and so are unlikely to get employment in the care sector now or in the future. You must declare all criminal convictions to the college otherwise we cannot advise you properly.

10: Calculation of the overall qualification grade

The calculation of the overall qualification grade is based on the student’s performance in all units. Students are awarded a Pass, Merit or Distinction qualification grade using the points gained through all 120 credits, at Level 4 for the HNC or Level 5 for the HND, based on unit achievement. The overall qualification grade is calculated in the same way for the HNC and for the HND.

All units in valid combination must have been attempted for each qualification. All 120 credits count in calculating the grade (at each level, as applicable). The overall qualification grade for the HND will be calculated based on student performance in Level 5 units only.

Units that have been attempted but not achieved, and subsequently granted compensation, will appear as ‘Unclassified’; i.e. a ‘U’ grade, on the student’s Notification of Performance, that is issued with the student certificate.

Points per credit
Pass :4
Merit :6
Distinction :8

 

Point boundaries
Grade Point boundaries
Pass 420−599
Merit 600−839
Distinction 840 +

 

11: What are the employment and further study opportunities for these qualifications?

Having a BTEC HNC/ HND provides a solid grounding in healthcare practice which students can build on should they decide to continue their studies beyond the Certificate/ Diploma stage.

On successful completion of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma, students can develop their careers in the healthcare sector through:

  • Entering employment
  • Continuing existing employment
  • Linking with the appropriate Professional Body
  • Committing to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • Progressing to university.

Those who enter employment in the healthcare sector may do so in job roles such as:

  • Lower non-clinical managerial
  • Co-ordinator and supervisory roles in healthcare administration
  • Operation and support services, e.g. information, office, patient services, estates, health improvement services.

Successful completion of the BTEC HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a related honours degree at a UK university. The qualification is recognised by Higher Education providers (eg. universities) as meeting admission requirements to many relevant healthcare practice-related courses, including, for example:

  • BSc (Hons) in Management Studies (Health and Social Care)
  • BA/BSc (Hons) in Health and Social Care
  • BA/BSc (Hons) in Health Studies
  • BSc (Hons) in Adult Nursing
  • BSc (Hons) in Public Health
  • BSc (Hons) in Health Promotion.

Students should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific Higher Education providers where they wish to gain admission and ‘top-up’ their HND.

12: Entry requirements and admissions

The City College is required by Pearson to ensure that every student we enrol has a reasonable expectation of success on the programme. All applicants must be at least 18 years of age.

Applicants aged over 21 years at the start of their course and who have been out of education for at least three years are classed as ‘mature students’. The prior qualifications and/ or work experience of such applicants will be reviewed by the College to consider if their individual profile shows they have the potential to achieve the qualification. If we believe it does and all other requirements of the admissions process are met, such applicants may be enrolled.

For those who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following:

  • A relevant BTEC Level 3 qualification
  • A GCE Advanced Level profile that demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades A* to C and/or 9 to 4 (or equivalent) in subjects such as Maths and English
  • Other related Level 3 qualifications
  • An Access to Higher Education Diploma awarded by an approved further education institution
  • Related work experience
  • An international equivalent of the above.

Applicants for the HND Healthcare Practice programme must be in suitable employment before the programme commences in order to be enrolled. The employment may be paid or unpaid – see above for further work experience/ placement requirements.

13: Application process

All applicants must first submit all relevant documents in the following checklist to the College with a completed application form:

  • Completed Application form which has been signed at the back
  • Passport size photo
  • An up-to-date CV
  • Passport or other official photo ID
  • Qualification certificates
  • Next of Kin/ emergency contact phone number and address
  • Proof of address which includes your full name and current address
  • Letter from your employer confirming you are in suitable employment.

After all the documents have been checked, the applicant must sit an entry test as part of the admissions process. If the test is passed, applicants are invited for an interview. After the interview, all components of the process are considered, and the student will be informed of the decision, normally within 48 hours.

Applicants to the HND Healthcare Practice programme should note that your employer must be willing to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the college so responsibilities and expectations are agreed and clear (more information about this can be found out by contacting the admin department).

14: English language ability for non-native speakers (not born in the UK)

Non-native English speakers who have not undertaken their final two years of schooling in English, must demonstrate capability in English at Level 2 (or equivalent) before being admitted to the programme. Equivalent grades to Level 2 include CEFR B2, PTE 51, and IELTS 5.5 (reading and writing must be at 5.5).

15: English language ability for non-native speakers who were taught in English for the final two years of school (or more)

Some applicants will not be native-speakers but will have studied the final two years of school in English (eg. those from West Africa).

16: Additional Costs

It is vital that all students have their own up-to-date computer/ laptop and internet for blended learning/assessment/access to online college resources.

All applicants are advised that the fees paid cover the cost of tuition for programme delivery, but there may be additional costs to cover, for example, books if required, stationary, awarding body registration fees, professional body registration fees, and travel costs to events.

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Start On 19/09/2022
Duration HNC - 1 year Full-Time or HND - 2 years Full-Time
Level HNC - LEVEL 4 CERTIFICATE or HND - LEVEL 5 DIPLOMA
Price £6,000 / year

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