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BTEC Higher National Certificate or Diploma in Social and Community Work (Social Care Leadership and Management)

About the course

1: Why choose a BTEC Higher National qualification in Social and Community Work?

The purpose of BTEC Higher National qualifications in Social and Community Work is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals able to meet the demands of employers in the social and community work sector and adapt to a constantly changing world. BTEC Higher Nationals include a Level 4 Certificate (HNC) and a Level 5 Diploma (HND). The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them.

BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to help students secure the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed to succeed in the workplace. They represent the latest in professional standards and provide opportunities for students to develop behaviours for work, for example by undertaking a group project, or responding to a client brief.

At the same time the BTEC Higher Nationals are intended to keep doors open for future study should a student wish to progress further in their education after their level 5 study. They do this by allowing space for the development of higher education study skills, such as the ability to research.

Key Information

Starting Dates January / April / September
Mode of Study Full-time
Duration HNC – One year / HND – Two years
Awarding Body Pearson
Award Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in
Social and Community Work (Social Care Leadership and Management)
Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in
Social and Community Work (Social Care Leadership and Management)
Price Per Year Full Time £6,000/year
* STUDENT LOAN AVAILABLE *
2: Who are these qualifications for?

The BTEC HNC/ HND in Social and Community Work is aimed at you if you want to continue your education through applied learning! Higher Nationals provide a wide-ranging study of the health and social care sector and are designed for students who wish to pursue or advance their career in social and community work or related fields.

In addition to the knowledge, understanding and skills that underpin the study of the health and social care sector, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Social and Community Work give students experience of the breadth and depth of the sector that will prepare them for further study or training.

3: Who awards the qualifications?

The BTEC Higher National qualifications are awarded by Pearson and The City College works in partnership with this organisation to deliver the programme. As the awarding organisation, Pearson has approved The City College to offer a variety of HND qualifications. The College’s management team is then responsible for ensuring that the quality of the provision offered meets Pearson’s exacting conditions and standards.

Quality is monitored regularly through visits from Pearson’s External Examiners and a regular Pearson Annual Management Review.

4: Qualification numbers

The Ofqual Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) qualification numbers are as follows:

  • Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Social and Community Work: 603/2492/2
  • Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Social and Community Work: 603/2493/4
5: Why choose BTEC?

BTECs are work-related qualifications for students taking their first steps into employment, or for those already in employment and seeking career development opportunities. BTECs provide progression into the workplace either directly or via study at university and are also designed to meet the needs of employers. Therefore, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals are widely recognised by industry and higher education as the principal vocational qualification at Levels 4 and 5.

6: Aims of the Level 4 HNC and Level 5 HND in Social and Community Work

The Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Social and Community Work offers students a broad introduction to the subject area via a mandatory core of learning, while allowing for the acquisition of skills and experience through specialist pathways and the selection of optional units across a range of occupationally relevant subjects at Level 4. This effectively builds underpinning core and specialist skills while preparing the student for further subject specialisation at Level 5. Students will gain a wide range of sector knowledge tied to practical skills gained in evidence-based practice, personal research, self-study, directed study and workplace learning and experience.

Holders of he Level 4 HNC will be able to demonstrate a sound knowledge of the basic concepts, values and principles of Social and Community Work, and the skills to perform effectively as a support worker in a number of different settings in the health and social care sector. They will be able to communicate accurately and appropriately and they will have the behaviours and qualities needed for employment that requires some degree of personal responsibility. They will have developed a range of transferable skills to ensure effective team working, independent initiatives, organisational competence and problem-solving strategies. They will be adaptable and flexible in their approach to social and community work, show resilience under pressure, and meet challenging targets within a given resource.

Holders of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in their field of study and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. They will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. They will be able to perform effectively in their chosen field and will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

7: Programme Structure

The programme at Level 4 and Level 5 follows the ‘Social Care Leadership and Management’ pathway. The normal timescale for achieving a Level 4 HNC by full-time study is one-year. The normal timescale for achieving a Level 5 HND by full-time study is two-years. Progression to Year 2 of the programme is dependent on satisfactory completion of Year 1.

The one-year Level 4 HNC:

  • Requires successful completion of 7 units
  • Mixes 4 mandatory core, 2 specialist mandatory, and 1 specialist/ optional unit, each with a value of 15 credits except ‘Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice’ which is 30 credits (120 total)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 1200 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 480 hours.

The two-year Level 5 HND:

  • Requires successful completion of a further 7 units (therefore 14 in total)
  • Mixes 2 mandatory core, 3 mandatory specialist, and 2 specialist/ optional units, each with a value of 15 credits except ‘Investigating Innovative Approaches to Practice in Social and Community Work’ which is 30 credits (240 total minimum)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 2400 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 960 hours.

TQT is an estimate of the total amount of time that could reasonably be expected to be required for a student to achieve and demonstrate the achievement of the level of attainment necessary for the award of a qualification. It can include, for example, guided learning, independent and unsupervised research/ learning, unsupervised coursework, watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar, and unsupervised work-based learning.

GLH are defined as the time when a tutor is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. Guided Learning includes any supervised assessment activity; this includes invigilated examination and observed assessment and observed work-based practice.

The 240 credits achieved by successful completion of the HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a social and community work related honours degree at a UK university (see section 8 below).

8: What is studied and how is it timetabled and assessed?

The academic year is divided into three terms and in each term you will normally be timetabled to study 2-3 units. You will usually be timetabled for at least three days per week and it must be noted that the timetable changes from term-to-term as the programme develops and units are completed.

A variety of forms of assessment evidence will be used, suited to the type of learning outcomes being assessed. Some units, for example, require a practical demonstration of skills while others require students to carry out their own research and analysis, working independently or as part of a team.

Methods of assessment may include, for example, writing a report or essay, recording an interview or role play, examination or in-class tests, giving a presentation with assessor questioning, making a PowerPoint presentation, creating academic posters, displays or leaflets, or keeping a reflective journal.

Year 1

Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Social and
Community Work (Social Care Leadership and Management)
Unit Unit Title Unit level Unit credit
Core unit
Mandatory
1
Law, Policy and Ethical Practice in Health and Social Care Law, Policy and Ethical Practice in Health and Social Care
UNIT 1: Law, Policy and Ethical Practice in Health and Social Care
Introduction

Health and social care practitioners are regulated by, and must adhere to, a range of law and policy when working within the most common settings of health trusts, primary care and other public authority settings. Even those working in voluntary, non-profit and private organisations will require a sound understanding of law and policy in order to practice proficiently, safely, ethically and legally. This unit develops students’ knowledge and appreciation of the need for them to be thoroughly informed about relevant law and policy. Further to this, the unit presents opportunities for students to apply relevant law and policy in practice settings, both actual and realistic, and to consider the place of codes of practice and ethics in their day-to-day work.
The Learning Outcomes in this unit build progressively from core underpinning legal principles and perspectives to national and international law on key topics such as rights and equality, and subject-specific law and policy, within health and care practice. Students will investigate the legal and policy framework related to health and care practice in different settings, leading to opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge and skills through targeted assignments.
Students will evaluate the relative weight of, for example, statute law, case law, codes of practice and organisational policy, and will develop an understanding of how to access advice and guidance if unclear about a path to follow. Students will consider how legal and ethical frameworks are interpreted and applied to different settings within the community, hospitals and other areas of health and care. Students will apply this learning to explore the relevance of statute, case law, codes of practice and organisational policy to their own and others’ practice.
The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will support students in understanding how and when to access advice and guidance on legal issues relating to health, care and support service practice and provision. On completion of this unit, students will have acquired a good working knowledge of the way that legislation supports the development of policy and underpins ethical practice in health and care settings. This will support progression in employment and continuing higher education in areas related to health and social care.


Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1 Explore the legal framework within which health and social care practitioners operate
2 Describe key legislation, national and organisational policy of fundamental importance to the health, care or support service practitioner
3 Interpret the law in relation to key ethical and professional Practice Themes in health and social care
4 Apply law and policy in line with regulatory and ethical requirements in a relevant practice setting.

4 15
2
Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice
UNIT 2: Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice
Introduction

Reflecting on our daily activities is an automatic process: it is part of human nature, and something conducted often unconsciously. Reflective practice involves selfobservation and evaluation with the goal of refining practice on an ongoing basis. Reflecting on what we do is a fundamental skill that helps us to develop, improve personally and professionally. It is an active, dynamic process that also helps develop confidence in our ability to perform our daily working practice and to become proactive, professional leaders. The art of reflection is a tool that students will carry with them through and beyond their educational journeys and is a requisite for many roles in the sector. Developing the necessary skills early helps students to be prepared for their career progression pathways.
This unit is intended to run alongside other units in this qualification in order that students may gather evidence to compile a Professional Learning and Development Portfolio (PLAD) which captures evidence of learning and development against a framework of Practice Themes which forms the essential core running through the unit. The unit aims to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for students to reflect on their own and others’ daily practice and improve students’ own practice and professional development.
Students will firstly develop an understanding of the purpose and importance of continually reviewing their own practice and professional development through an exploration of the benefits and issues associated with reviewing practice. They will then develop their knowledge and skills of theoretical models and other techniques needed to support them in carrying out active, dynamic, action-based, real-time reflection. Students will record their evidence in the PLAD which will comprise learning from this and other units on an ongoing basis. Finally, students will evaluate their reflective journeys and the effectiveness of the PLAD in supporting their ongoing personal and professional development.
On successful completion of this unit, students will have gained the necessary knowledge and skills to complete a professional development portfolio that records evidence of a continuous cycle of reflection and improvement of knowledge and skills and be able to plan for their future career pathway.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explain the role of reflection in health and social care practice
2. Use the Practice Themes as a framework for reflection
3. Demonstrate active, ongoing, critical reflection of learning experiences
4. Assess the overall success of own reflective journey and consider future career pathway.

4 30
3
Mental Health and Wellbeing: a Whole Person Approach
UNIT 3: Mental Health and Wellbeing: a Whole Person Approach
Introduction

The term ‘mental health’ is often used when mental illness or disorder is actually being referred to. It is important that students explore what is meant by mental health in its positive sense, what does it mean to be mentally healthy? It is estimated that one in four people will experience mental ill-health during their lifetime, therefore the mental health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities should be a primary concern of all those working in social or community work. A good understanding of individual mental health is important for staff employed in social and community work settings. Work in this sector can be stressful at times and it is vital that workers can identify their own mental health needs, take action to protect their mental wellbeing and are aware of sources of support for themselves as well as the individuals they provide care or support to.
This unit aims to provide an opportunity for students to explore definitions of mental health and wellbeing and the complex range of factors that influence our mental health. They will be encouraged to discuss mental wellbeing as a continuum, with mental health and emotional wellbeing fluctuating over time. Influences on mental health will be reviewed, including the interrelation of physical health, mental health and emotional wellbeing as well as social, psychological and environmental factors. Students will be encouraged to consider the range of factors that protect the mental health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities and assess strategies that can be employed to maximise protective factors and build resilience. This unit will also provide students with the opportunity to explore strategies to maintain their own mental health and wellbeing.
Students will develop skills in independent and collaborative research, and develop an understanding of the risk and protective factors influencing mental health and wellbeing. Students will explore strategies that can be used to promote positive mental health in groups they work with, as well as developing an understanding of protecting their own mental health while employed in the social and community work sector.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Review the factors that influence mental health and emotional wellbeing
2. Explain the value of early intervention in promoting positive mental health
3. Assess strategies to promote mental wellbeing in individuals and communities
4. Review the measures that social and community workers can take to promote their own mental health and resilience.

4 15
4
Fundamentals of Evidence-based Practice (Pearson-set Project)
UNIT 4: Fundamentals of Evidence-based Practice (Pearson-set Project)
Introduction

Evidence-based practice in health and social care involves taking a systematic approach to examining a range of evidence in order to answer key questions of relevance to the sector. The basis of evidence-based practice is research. In health and social care, research is conducted for a number of reasons for example, to find prevalence or incidence of disease, to assess quality of life or patient satisfaction. Research has global relevance and plays a significant role in influencing the development of high-quality provision, supporting a high-functioning integrated workforce and promoting the health and wellbeing of those who use health, care services.
Working in health and social care provides unique opportunities for practitioners to make a difference, developing the skills and knowledge to conduct research is fundamental in order to support quality practice, influence positive change and promote a highly-skilled workforce.
The aim of this unit is to develop students’ knowledge and skills to understand the purpose and process of research in health and social care particularly in relation to promoting integrated approaches to care. Students will carry out a literature review on a topic drawn from the Practice Themes aimed at quality improvement within wider health, care or support service practice. Students will learn how to source current literature and assess the reliability and validity of sources to be able to construct an argument that leads to a proposal for a potential research study. Throughout this process, students will learn how they can dynamically influence changes and improvements within the health and social care sector. The unit will develop students’ skills in understanding the steps they need to take to complete a literature review, academic conventions for presenting literature and how it forms the rationale for a personal research project.
On completion of this unit, students will have developed the pre-requisite skills needed to design a proposal that either extends from their literature review or highlights a further potential area of research. Possessing the necessary skills for conducting quality personal research that leads to evidence-based practice, will enhance students’ academic skills, professionalism and employment opportunities within the health and social care sector.
*Please refer to the accompanying Pearson-set Assignment Guide and the Theme Release document for further support and guidance on the delivery of the Pearsonset unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explain the role of research for evidence-based practice in health and social care
2. Conduct a review of key literature relating to a research topic towards improvements in care practice
3. Develop a project proposal using evidence-based practice
4. Examine the value of the literature review process in influencing positive change in health, care or support service provision.

4 15
Specialist Unit
Mandatory
5
Organisational Contexts of Social and Community Work
UNIT 5: Organisational Contexts of Social and Community Work
Introduction

Social and community work takes place within a range of settings, including people’s own homes. The role of the practitioner in social and community work is diverse and requires skills and knowledge that can be adapted to areas of care. The diverse range of service provision will reflect the needs of local populations and the current climate of society’s approaches to providing support and care. In addition, social and community work operates within organisational frameworks influenced by various factors, including government policy, policy reforms, funding restrictions and demographic shifts. The work relies upon organisational structures that are based upon current legislative and regulatory frameworks required to meet social needs within different settings.
In this unit, students will identify the organisational context of the area of work they are engaged in and analyse the factors that affect the construct of organisational policies. They will consider the area of the work and the effects of internal and external drivers on the development of the service provision.
This unit will enable students to take a wider viewpoint of the functions of social and community work within society and the impact of changing organisational contexts. Completion of this unit will provide a basis for further study in the area of social policy, change management, policy development and management studies.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Define the contexts underpinning the organisation of social and community work
2. Explore the effects of external drivers and policy reform on social and community care service provision
3. Review the role of the care worker in developing partnership approaches to social and community work
4. Examine the ways that an organisation providing social or community services meets the needs of the individual service user.

4 15
6
Social Policy and Administration
UNIT 6: Social Policy and Administration
Introduction

The welfare of individuals is affected not only by their own actions but also by that of others. The state has a role to play in improving welfare as well as in overseeing the practicalities of service organisation and delivery in an increasingly complex and diverse society. For workers in this sector, it is important to develop a knowledge and appreciation of the need to be thoroughly informed about the impact of devolution, the European Union and wider international issues such as globalisation and how this has influenced social policy and the administration of services. Further to this, they need to develop an awareness of the impact of wider structural and cultural issues that may affect both the implementation of policy and service user access.
In this unit, students will explore the fundamental concepts of social policy, in particular the historical and current context of social policy, the role of central and local government, devolved government, and comparative and wider influences on social policy. Students will consider how policy is implemented, the importance of inter-organisational relationships and the impact of wider social policy structures and issues on service delivery. They will examine the impact of wider structural and cultural issues such as social exclusion, discrimination and roles, beliefs and ideologies. Students will analyse the importance of service-user involvement in the social policy process and how that involvement has developed over time, and will also be asked to consider its importance and what difference it has made. Finally, students will investigate the importance of partnership and inter-agency working, the constraints affecting service delivery and the importance of evaluating provision from the service user’s perspective. Students will then apply this learning and explore its relevance in their own and others’ practice.
This unit will support those interested in working directly with service users in a range of situations from local authority, independent and community settings. It is also useful for those who wish to continue on in higher education qualifications such as social work and related degree programmes.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore the current context of social policy and administration both nationally and on a global scale
2. Describe how influences on social policy impact social or community service organisation and delivery
3. Assess the wider structural and cultural issues that affect social policy and administration globally
4. Explore the value of service user involvement in the social policy process.

4 15
Plus ONE specialist/optional unit from the list given below (chosen by the College)
Plus ONE
specialist/optional
unit (chosen by
the College)
7
Contemporary Social Issues
Unit 7: Contemporary Social Issues
Introduction

Post-war recovery following the Second World War saw countries around the world taking a greater international and national statutory interest in achieving peace, stability and reducing inequalities between citizens e.g. on a global scale, the formation of the United Nations (UN) in 1945, and the World Health Organisation in 1948. One of the fundamental priorities of the UN at its establishment was to “achieve international co-operation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian character and in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion”. Many countries around the world supported this vision and reflected it in the restructure and development of national systems to tackle inequalities between citizens. The success of such systems has not been without challenges, especially as society’s needs evolve and change. How workers in health, social and community care services understand and respond to these changes is directly related to our capacity to provide the essential services required to improve the lives of those in need.
In this unit, students will develop their understanding of the contemporary social issues that give rise to inequalities, poverty and social injustice. They will explore historical contexts and their role in contributing to an understanding of how current day contemporary social issues have given rise to reform. Students will examine arguments positing the efficacy of addressing social issues through means such as enquiries and reform, looking at those which assert a reactive approach and produce legislation impacting on interpretations, delivery and the ability to tackle forms of inequality in practice. Students will explore a social issue applicable to their own situation and identify its impact on their own practice, the wellbeing of individual users of services, their families and the wider social and community work provision. They will assess the overall impact of social issues and debate the ways in which society deals with inequalities, diversity and inclusion. Students will use information to debate different types of reform and put forward their ideas to provide a robust service that promotes a positive framework for those employed in social and community work practice.
In completing this unit, students will have a broader, more practical understanding of contemporary social issues and the fundamental role social and community care workers play in enabling a fairer, more equal society. It is useful for students progressing to roles in community and social work support, as well as continuing in related higher education degrees.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe the historical context for contemporary social issues relevant to social and community work practice
2. Explore contemporary social issues in social and community work practice
3. Review a social issue in relation to own area of practice
4. Examine own role in challenging or advocating a contemporary social issue.

4 15
8
Community Development - Principles and Practice
Unit 8: Community Development - Principles and Practice
Introduction

Community development is undertaken by a wide range of people in different settings and roles. Community development practitioners may be paid (employed workers) or unpaid (community activists and voluntary workers). All community development practitioners need to be competent in the necessary skills and knowledge, and to work with integrity to support communities which may have few recognised resources and limited access to decision makers. Community development practice covers a number of areas and includes working with individuals, families and groups, supporting their wellbeing and addressing the issues of social, cultural and economic inequality experienced by communities.
In this unit, students will develop their knowledge and appreciation of the need for community development. Further, the unit will also develop students’ awareness of the impact of wider structural and cultural issues that may affect the implementation of community development initiatives, participation and access. Students will review the skills, values and processes required for community development practice, examining the key principles and how they are translated into practice. They will explore how to engage with communities in order to identify and respond to needs through action and go on to recognise the need to promote and support effective relationships with key professionals and individuals. They will consider ways in which to develop and promote opportunities for community learning and social change within a community.
The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will support students’ ability to understand the importance of locally driven community development, the role of facilitators and the dilemmas affecting community development. This unit will support students wishing to progress in working in community development as well as to continuing higher education in subjects related to community development.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe the characteristics of community development
2. Explore approaches to effecting social change through community development
3. Describe the processes involved in effective community development
4. Participate in a community development initiative.

4 15
11
Planning and Supporting Community-led Activities
Unit 11: Planning and Supporting Community-led Activities
Introduction

The concept of community cohesion in a society encompasses a sense of togetherness, bonding and belonging with other members in a community. Community cohesion is the ‘glue’ that holds a society together and is focused on avoiding the corrosive effects of inequalities and intolerances to bring about a society where individuals have shared ideals and values. The cost of care and support services in the UK can be high to those needing to access care services. Government initiatives and funding go some way to meet the financial costs through providing ‘pots of money’. However, such funds are often means-tested and rarely meet the full cost of the care that individuals need. Obtaining funding from other sources becomes a necessary requirement for those supporting care services.
This unit will introduce students to the concept of community through providing a brief overview of how community life has changed over the past decades and the factors that have contributed to a decline in community cohesion. Students will go on to understand the avenues of funding available and how they can access funding for initiatives to support community development. The core element of this unit requires students to champion a community-led activity for an initiative through identifying an area of need within their own area of social or community work practice. Students will develop a plan that illustrates budgets, human and physical resource needs and the potential impact of their idea on developing community cohesion.
By the end of this unit, students will have a broader experience of the skills required in promoting and carrying out community-led activities. This unit will also support progression to higher education opportunities in a variety of social or community work-related disciplines.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Discuss the concept of community cohesion and its impact on community work practice
2. Describe how different community-led activities can be funded
3. Explore the steps necessary to develop a strategy to raise funds for a community-led activity
4. Reflect on own performance in driving a community-led activity towards developing community cohesion.

4 15
12
Inspiring Young People
Unit 12: Inspiring Young People
Introduction

Young people today are growing up with ideals, expectations, ambitions and talents which are unprecedented, driven, as they are, by new technology, affluence and globalisation. Many will require support and encouragement in order to make a positive contribution to their communities. Understanding what kinds of activities and programmes can inspire, motivate and mobilise a new generation of young people to engage in society and contribute to their community is vital.
In this unit, students will improve their understanding of how to develop young people’s capacity to improve the quality of their own lives and to effect change in their communities. While there has been significant research and guidance on working with children, young people have often been overlooked. Students will explore how to engage with and mobilise young people to contribute to transforming and building more just, inclusive and equitable societies through shared values and principles. Furthermore, students will consider methods of inspiring young people’s participation in education or employment and will investigate the potential consequences of non-engagement.
Students will analyse ways in which to inspire young people and support them in making positive contributions to community and society, including the benefits of providing young people with opportunities to develop and exercise their leadership capabilities. They will explore the skills that enable effective leadership and which have broader significance beyond their potential to prepare young people to take on formal leadership roles. Students will consider the benefits for an individual young person, their peer group and society more generally.
This unit is particularly suitable for students who want to progress in roles in the education, training and support of children and young people, or in continuing higher education in studies such as childhood education and youth and community work.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe how to build relationships with young people
2. Explore how to develop young people’s participation and leadership skills
3. Examine methods of inspiring participation in education, employment or training
4. Apply strategies in own workplace to inspire young people in making positive contributions to community and society.

4 15
14
Health, Safety and Risk Management in Care Environments
Unit 14: Health, Safety and Risk Management in Care Environments
Introduction

Health and Safety legislation, regulations and adherence to agreed ways of working take priority in all care environments, including the homes of those individuals that social or community practitioners work with. The holistic approach to assessing health, safety and risk management serves to secure the rights and responsibilities of both the individual in receipt of care, the care worker and the care setting, as well as ensuring a person-centred approach in providing support. Further, by developing healthy and safe environments, practitioners that work in social and community care settings safeguard service users and protect them from harm.
In this unit, students will examine risk management, both formal and informal, and all aspects of risk-taking, making choices and seeking consent and acknowledgement of rights and responsibilities. They will learn to identify hazards in all areas of the social or community care environment, ensuring that appropriate and realistic safeguards are in place in line with agreed ways of working, legislative guidance and regulatory requirements. In investigating the role of the support worker, students will develop their understanding of safeguarding and protection while also recognising the need to acknowledge that we take risks in all aspects of our daily lives. Trying to remove any element of risk-taking can lead to limitation of activities and experiences and disempowerment of the individual. Therefore, students will be assessing person-centred approaches to healthy and safe environments and evaluating the legislative and regulatory frameworks upon which policies are developed in the work setting. Students will analyse their own role in supporting risk management and supporting the rights of the individual.
Completion of this unit will support progression to more senior roles through developing understanding and skills in policy review, risk assessment and supporting person-centred approaches in maintaining healthy and safe environments. Other opportunities for career progression may include accessing continuing higher education courses in health and social-care related fields.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore aspects of legislation, regulations and codes of practice that support health, safety and risk management in care environments
2. Determine own role in developing risk assessments and supporting risk-taking in safe environments
3. Examine the impact upon the individual of risks to personal safety and wellbeing
4. Review person-centred approaches to health, safety and risk management.

4 15
16
Sociological Approaches in Social and Community Work
Unit 16: Sociological Approaches in Social and Community Work
Introduction

Sociology is a social science relating to the study of human society. Sociologists seek to understand the nature of a society and how different systems within a society operate. At a macro level, organisational systems, such as governments, guide the way in which individuals should behave, setting ‘norms’ through laws, regulations and policing. At a micro level, family systems can incorporate systemic ‘norms’ but may interpret them in a way that fits their own beliefs, values, customs and behaviours. Core to the work practice of professionals in social and community care is the ability to provide support to individuals in an effort to maintain their independence, challenge inequality, improve their quality of life through social interaction and empower them to take an active part in society while protecting them from vulnerable situations.
In this unit, students will develop their knowledge and understanding of the core information that underpins sociological frameworks, exploring five main theoretical perspectives in sociology, including functionalism, symbolic interactionism and conflict theories and how these are used in social and community work practice. For example, students will explore the concepts of power and status posited by Weber’s panoptic-type disciplinary ideas and postulated by Foucault. Students will view gender, ethnicity, social class, disability, sexuality and age through the lens of sociological theory, exploring systems models of family, community, and organisations to be able to align these with their daily practice working with individuals. Finally, students will draw comparisons from an international perspective and evaluate the effectiveness of other systems in challenging and tackling inequalities and social deprivation.
This unit is essential for those wishing to progress to working in a range of settings and environments in the social and community work sector as well as for those wishing to progress to continuing higher education in areas such as social policy.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe factors influencing an individual’s vulnerability to social inequality
2. Explore sociological approaches used in social and community work practice
3. Explore how sociological approaches are used to address issues of social deprivation and inequality in own country
4. Compare sociological approaches to social and community work practice in different nations.

4 15
17
Effective Reporting and Record-keeping in Health and Social Care Services
Unit 17: Effective Reporting and Record-keeping in Health and Social Care Services
Introduction

With the use of technology becoming more widespread, information is increasingly easy to obtain, store and retrieve. However, it is also becoming easy for the wrong people to have access to information. With increasing emphasis on accuracy and digital safety and taking into consideration the sensitive information recorded and used in healthcare settings, practitioners responsible for handling data or other information are expected to take the initiative on managing records appropriately and efficiently, reporting accurately to line managers.
This unit is intended to introduce students to the process of reporting and recording information in health, care or support services; it will allow them to recognise the legal requirements and the regulatory body recommendations when using paper or computers to store information, as well as the correct methods of disposing of records. This unit will enable students to recognise the importance of accurate recording and appropriate sharing of information, and be able to keep and maintain records appropriately in their workplace.
Students will be expected to use appropriate methods to record and store information from their workplace and to follow data protection principles to use and dispose of the information on completion of tasks.
Students completing this unit will have developed the knowledge and skills to manage day-to-day recording and reporting which are essential to being an effective care practitioner and manager.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Describe the legal and regulatory aspects of reporting and record-keeping in a care setting
2. Explore the internal and external recording requirements in a care setting
3. Review the use of technology in reporting and recording service user care
4. Demonstrate how to keep and maintain records in a care setting in line with national and local policies and appropriate legislation.

4 15
18
Resource Planning in Social and Community Care Services
Unit 18: Resource Planning in Social and Community Care Services
Introduction

As a supervisor or manager in social and community care services, it is important to recognise that resource planning is not just about financial considerations. Resources can also be physical, human or operational and can include new or existing resources. The ability to identify and put in place appropriate and effective resources is key to supporting and promoting the positive health and wellbeing of individuals.
In this unit, students will understand the importance of identifying resources that meet the specific needs of individuals and situations. Students will understand how the principles of wellbeing, as well as specific, individual, organisational and regulatory needs, can be used to identify appropriate resources. They will discuss the skills and processes required for effective resource planning, taking into account the specific needs of individuals, families, carers, groups and communities in a wide range of contexts, including statutory and non-statutory social services, community organisations, criminal justice and educational welfare. Finally, students will conduct their own needs analysis on a specific task or activity in order to identify appropriate resources, examining the impact of the use of resources on provision, cost effectiveness and individual health and wellbeing in practice.
The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will support students in understanding the importance of resource identification, securing resources that are matched to need, and developing their own role as a community resource. This unit will support students wishing to progress to management positions in project management or similar roles as well as those wishing to continue in higher education in health or social care related subjects.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explain the importance of effective resource identification in social and community care services
2. Explore individual and organisational factors that give rise to the need for specific resources in social and community care services
3. Explain the process of needs analysis in supporting and promoting effective use of resources
4. Conduct a needs assessment on a specific aspect of provision in a social or community care service.

4 15

 

Year 2

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Social and
Community Work (Social Care Leadership and Management)
Unit Unit Title Unit level Unit credit
Core unit
Mandatory
19
Reflective Approaches in Implementing Person-centered Practice
Unit 19: Reflective Approaches in Implementing Person-centered Practice
Introduction

Reflective practice is used throughout the healthcare profession as a means to improving the practitioner’s skills, reviewing how they have dealt with situations that have occurred and identified areas that need further development. Overall this enables the practitioner to provide a high-quality service and adopt a more professional approach to the user of services. Being a reflective practitioner is key to lifelong learning and development for working in health, care and support service professions. Reflective practice works to ensure that a high-quality service is offered to the users of services and the effective practitioner identifies areas for development and where they can share good practice.
This unit builds on learning from Unit 2: Demonstrating Professional Principles and Values in Health and Social Care Practice. It provides students with an opportunity to further develop their skills as reflective practitioners. The evidence for the unit will be based on theoretical considerations as well as practice within the workplace. It requires students to bring together their classroom and workplace learning across their programme, demonstrating their professional development using reflective approaches. Learning in the workplace will be supplemented with wider understanding and knowledge from all parts of the course.
Through this unit, students will be supported to take responsibility for their own learning, demonstrate their capacity to continuously learn and grow, reflect on their own practice and encourage others to develop their practice. It enables students to have a greater understanding of person-centred care, the legal and ethical framework under which practitioners operate, and further develop the skills required to develop them as reflective healthcare practitioners throughout their learning and career in the health and social care sector.
As students will be reflecting using examples from real practice in their workplace setting, it is essential that students respect the confidentiality of information used within this unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Promote a holistic approach to person-centred practice
2. Review current policies, legislation and regulations in relation to effective person-centred practice
3. Reflect on own practice within health, care and support settings
4. Explore ways to develop own professional skills and behaviours in relation to health, care or support service provision.

5 15
20
Investigating Innovative Approaches to Practice in Social and Community Work
Unit 20: Investigating Innovative Approaches to Practice in Social and Community Work
Introduction

We live in an ever-changing world in which what is current today may not be tomorrow. The arrival of technology and computers has directly changed the way we communicate and do things. In today’s working environment, terms such as ‘innovation’, ‘creativity’ and ‘enterprise’ are not only being used in the commercial world but also in world of social and community care. Very often they are used interchangeably even though they mean different things. The commonality between each of these terms is the development of a solution-focused approach to unanticipated problems that may arise and finding a simple but original response to them.
In this unit, students will focus on what it means to be innovative, what innovative practice in social and community work means in reality, and the potential impact it can have on the service user. They will examine how organisations are increasingly building a culture of innovation through engaging with staff and creating workplace environments where innovation can be fostered. Students will study a range of key terms and concepts related to innovation and will investigate how innovation in social work, although not a new concept, has produced new ways of tackling problems and has had a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals. Students will undertake research within their own area of work and identify how innovation is influencing their workplace, the work of others that they interact with and the impact on the service user. Students will evaluate how their own research skills can promote evidence-based practice and impact positively on an organisation, as well as contributing to their own professional development.
This unit will support those interested in working directly with service users in a range of situations from local authority, independent and community settings. It is also useful for those who wish to progress onto higher education or professional qualifications such as social policy, social work or international development. It is also useful for those who intend to progress in their employment into management or more senior roles in social or community care.

Learning Outcomes

1. Discuss how innovative approaches to community and social work practice can effect improvement
2. Examine how organisations manage and develop innovative practice
3. Review how own research and investigation skills can support innovation in social and community work practice
4. Demonstrate project-based learning in investigating the impact of innovation on current social or community work practice.

5 30
Specialist Unit
Mandatory
23
Managing Quality in Care Environments
Unit 23: Managing Quality in Care Environments
Introduction

Every organisation should strive for excellence in service and in health and social care, the process of continuous improvement to safety, wellbeing and satisfaction is a hallmark of effective service provision. Staff and service users should be reassured that managers recognise the benefits of improvement to the quality of provision, and the impact of the individual on the overall success of the organisation. Being able to able to understand and implement continuous improvement measures is part of the manager’s role in care service provision. Further, increasing demands on care settings to improve quality of service have identified the importance of all staff understanding the different perspectives on, and methods of, achieving quality on a daily basis.
This unit will enable students to develop their knowledge of these differing perspectives, to review the requirements of external regulatory bodies and to analyse these in relation to the needs of patients, customers, staff and other internal stakeholders. Students will explore the methods used to assess different quality markers as well as strategies for managing service quality in order to maintain continuous improvement and positive outcomes. Further, students will have the opportunity to use this knowledge to plan, implement, monitor and evaluate a small-scale quality improvement initiative in their own work setting.
A manager in care settings would be expected to be a driving force in terms of quality improvement. This unit will provide students with the knowledge and skills that employers will expect their managers to bring to the setting.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Assess the impact legislation and policy has on measuring and monitoring quality of practice in a health and social care
2. Discuss the impact that improving quality has on different individuals in a care setting
3. Explore quality improvement requirements in a care setting
4. Plan and monitor improvements to quality.

5 15
29
Commissioning Projects and Services
Unit 29: Commissioning Projects and Services
Introduction

The planning, organisation, buying, and monitoring of social and community care services is known as commissioning. In the UK, this is carried out by the local government through commissioning teams. The act of commissioning a service consists of setting out what service is required, its delivery structure and confirmation of its approaches and outcomes. Commissioning also involves the contracting and procurement of the service and the process is based upon the commissioning cycle. Strategic commissioning of social care is complex and challenging due to reducing budgets, changing demographics, growing demands and expectations, as well as personalisation of care packages. There is a drive in the sector to involve users and carers more actively in decisions about social care services, and in evidencing the difference the services make to people’s quality of life to provide a sound evidence base for commissioning.
In this unit, students will explore the restrictions and challenges involved in commissioning projects as well as the processes involved in developing contracts and procuring the best value service. Students will gain a clear understanding of the ways in which services are developed and the structures of local commissioning teams who act on behalf of local councils or governments. They will explore the role of the supervisor or manager in care services.
This unit will support and develop students’ overview of strategic planning in social and community care, and will develop understanding of processes that facilitate service delivery in local areas. This will prepare them for progress into more senior roles in care leadership and management or continuing higher education in social policy, administration or management degrees.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Investigate the process of the commissioning cycle in developing projects and services in care
2. Review partnership approaches in ensuring that services and projects meet the needs of individuals requiring the service
3. Contribute to the planning for a project or delivery of a service in social and community care in response to commissioning requirements
4. Support service user involvement in the decision-making process in commissioning of projects and services.

5 15
39
Supervising and Managing Others in Social and Community Care
Unit 39: Supervising and Managing Others in Social and Community Care
Introduction

Management and supervision in social and community practice are keystones to service provision. The quality and competence of these make a significant difference to operational performance, cohesive team working and the health and wellbeing of individuals. Making a transition into management in social services carries with it the responsibility of supervising and managing teams but also further opportunities for progression to more senior roles within social and community service provision.
This unit is aimed at students new to the management and/or supervision of others’ practice and service delivery within a particular work setting. Students will first understand the primary functions, core professional competencies and behaviours needed to effectively supervise and manage others in social and community service provision. They will explore more specific tasks, activities and duties, including supervising workload and case management systems and practices, developing relationships with individuals and supervising induction processes. Students will also investigate different ways in which they can effectively supervise and manage others in group and individual situations and the requirements for recording and storing records relating to supervision. To complete this unit, students will conduct a critical review of their own effectiveness and professional development in innovating and championing best practice and driving change.
This unit supports students intending to move to more senior positions within social and community work practice or who intend to continue in higher education in social and community care administration and management and social policy related areas.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Discuss key concepts underpinning the supervision and management of others in social and community care-related settings
2. Examine practice requirements for those who supervise and manage others in social and community care environments
3. Explore supervision and management strategies in group and individual situations
4. Review own role in influencing development and change through the supervision and management of others.

5 15
Plus TWO specialist/ optional units from the list given below (chosen by the College)
Plus TWO specialist/
optional units
(chosen by the
College)
22
Coproduction and Partnership Working in Social and Community Work
Unit 22: Coproduction and Partnership Working in Social and Community Work
Introduction

Coproduction refers to professionals, carers, service users and others in the community working together to define and achieve shared goals relating to the improvement of the quality of life of individuals and their communities. It serves to remove barriers, recognises the service user as an asset to the service and enables the service user to be at the centre of the services they receive. Social and community services working in partnership is an essential element of this collaborative approach to service provision.
This unit will help students to understand the use of coproduction and partnership working to enable effective systems of care for different individuals accessing support from social or community care services. In this unit, students will explore how shared goals are defined, agreed and achieved through working in a way that identifies and values individuals’ skills, building on their existing capabilities and taking a collaborative approach to the planning and provision of systems of care and support. Students will explore the value of collaborative thinking within teams and coproduction to find and work towards shared solutions.
Utilising the principles and practice of coproduction will support students to develop their knowledge around the importance of individual work with peer and personal support networks, alongside professional systems and networks of support. Students will also consider the importance of protecting service users’ rights in coproduction in such a way that promotes workers and professionals as facilitators of change, rather than being seen as enablers or directors of care or support. Students will develop effective approaches to collaborative relationships with professionals and servicer users that contribute to making improvements in the quality of life of individuals in a community-based organisation.
On completion of this unit, students will be able to apply the core values that underpin coproduction, including self-responsibility in acknowledging that the person themselves is the expert in understanding their own situation and in supporting an asset-based approach to support. This unit will support students’ progress in career pathways and also in continuing higher education in social and community work-related areas.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore the value of coproduction as a mechanism for working with service users in social and community care-related settings
2. Review current policies, principles and practice in relation to enabling effective partnership working to support coproduction
3. Examine the impact of coproduction on individual service users’ wellbeing and in relation to service improvement
4. Reflect on own practice of working in partnership and coproduction within a social or community care-related setting.

5 15
26
Supporting Team and Partnership Working Across Health and Social Care Services
Unit 26: Supporting Team and Partnership Working Across Health and Social Care Services
Introduction

It is important for organisations to work together to enable access to services to be provided for the continuation of care and the well- being for the users of services. This will help to ensure that high-quality provision is offered which is efficient. It is also important for an integrated service to be applied when the authorities are dealing with safeguarding and protection to ensure that the health, social services, and police are aware of children and adults that may need to be supported and if they are at risk.
The aim of this unit is to help students understand the difference between the function of a manager and the role of a leader, and be able to apply this understanding in supporting the development of effective teams.
Students will consider the leadership and management characteristics, behaviours and traits which enable effective and seamless integrated care provision when working in partnership in teams across health, care and support service organisations. In addition, students will investigate how partnership working is applied across different services and give examples of where good practice is being applied.
On completion of this unit, students will have demonstrated that they can work in a leadership role as part of a team and will have developed their knowledge and understanding of how partnership working benefits the users of services and organisations across health, care and support service provision. The leadership qualities that will be enhanced during the unit will help students to gain confidence and understanding when working as part of a team, or as a leader, which will support employment opportunities in the healthcare sector and progress into healthcare-related degree programmes. Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Differentiate between the role of a leader and the function of a manager
2. Discuss the role of partnership working across health, care and support services
3. Explore the outcomes of positive partnership working across health, care and support services
4. Examine own contributions to working as part of a team.

5 15
30
Community Development Practice
Unit 30: Community Development Practice
Introduction

The growing issues and divides in society, and the inequality of allocation of resources and wealth across the world, emphasise the need for community development practice to uphold the rights of the individual. The basic principles of this practice are based upon theoretical perspectives of social classification and social justice. Models of community development reinforce responses to everchanging economic and political influences and promote projects that are selfsustaining and innovative, reducing inequality and supporting positive and sustainable development in communities. Working in community development practice requires practitioners with vision, energy and drive, people capable of understanding the global influences on community development practice.
Students taking this unit are required to have completed Unit 8: Community Development - Principles and Practice. In this unit, students will be focusing on specific community development activity in their local area - referring to the projects and initiatives that are provided to meet local needs. These community development projects should be specific and responsive to the community. They are likely to be needs-led activities and services that rely upon local responses, volunteers and funding through social enterprise and local government grants.
As a result of studying this unit, students will have a wider awareness of the issues involved and the skills required for planning and implementing community development projects. They may be interested in travel and volunteering opportunities or, equally, in supporting development projects in local areas. This unit will also support progression to higher education opportunities in a variety of social or community work-related disciplines.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore approaches to community development
2. Examine community development projects with local communities
3. Review the role of the social or community care worker in facilitating projects that support community development
4. Reflect upon the contribution of own role in supporting partnership approaches in community development.

5 15
32
Team and Individual Leadership: Mentoring and Coaching Others
Unit 32: Team and Individual Leadership: Mentoring and Coaching Others
Introduction

The purpose of this unit is to enable students to understand the role and contribution of mentorship in health and social care, which is to support the personal development and lifelong learning of staff. Mentorship is achieved through effective leadership, mentoring and/or coaching. Health and social care workers need to be able to differentiate between team and individual leadership, mentoring and coaching, and know how to apply these in their own practice.
This unit will support students’ understanding of mentoring as establishing and developing learning relationships that support people to take charge of their own development. The unit will enable students to develop their confidence and motivation, through self-reflection and improved understanding, and their interpersonal skills. Further, this unit aims to develop students’ practice in being able to lead, mentor and coach others in health and social care-related environments.
Students will review relevant theories, approaches and principles of leadership, mentoring and coaching, as well as considering the purposes and benefits of mentoring in health and social care practice. Further, students will plan, implement and review a period of mentoring in their own workplace.
The focus on personal and professional development through developing others will support students’ progress through lifelong learning and increase their capacity to develop as well-rounded practitioners in the sector. The learning gained from this unit can also provide the foundation for undertaking further professional qualifications in coaching.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Review theories and principles of team and individual leadership, mentoring and coaching in health and social care
2. Explore how mentorship, through mentoring and coaching practices, can benefit individuals and organisations in care environments
3. Apply mentoring and coaching techniques to support mentorship of individuals in care environments
4. Review own leadership and mentoring practice in a care environment

5 15
46
Global Contexts of Community Development
Unit 46: Global Contexts of Community Development
Introduction

Community development is often thought of as a local approach to problem-solving. With globalisation comes a globalised economy and transnational organisations concerned with a range of social issues. Global processes have an impact on local community development and community development practitioners, who may be paid (employed workers) or unpaid (community activists and voluntary workers), so they need to have an understanding of how to use global mechanisms to advance local needs. Community development is a process whereby global efforts are united with those of local people to improve the social, cultural and economic conditions of communities.
This unit develops students’ knowledge and appreciation of the global mechanisms that impact on local community development and supports them in how to make best use of these mechanisms to advance local needs. It examines how global, economic, political, environmental and social forces are reshaping the world in which we live, particularly in places that are generally thought to be the less developed areas of the world. In this unit, students will explore ideas of community and the principles of national and international community development. They will consider the issues and dichotomy of community development between the global north and global south. In addition, students will examine the principle of participation as a prerequisite for community development, the role of community development organisations to build global collaborations to bring about solidarity and the skill of thinking globally yet acting locally.
The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will support students’ knowledge and understanding in relation to comparative social policies in local and global community development. This unit supports students’ progress in employment in various areas of community development, particularly with organisations operating internationally. It also supports students continuing in higher education in subjects such as community work, community development, and international development.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore the international context of community development
2. Explore the differences in the development of communities in the ‘global north’ and the ‘global south’
3. Discuss how global approaches to community development impact on community development within countries
4. Explain the central role that local participation plays in supporting international community development.

5 15

 

9: Compulsory work experience/ placement requirements

The Level 4 HNC in Social and Community Work Practice requires at least 225 hours of work experience/ placement in social or community care settings. A minimum of 75 hours in one social or community care setting is required. You can undertake placement in more than one setting, providing they meet the minimum requirement for types of setting as indicated above.

The Level 5 HND in Social and Community Work requires at least 375 hours of work experience/ placement in social or community care settings. A minimum of 100 hours in at least one social or community care settings is required. Students can undertake placement in more than two different individual settings, providing they meet the minimum requirement for hours’ placement as indicated above.

Suitable work placements include:

Social Care (and healthcare)

  • Hospice (adult and child)
  • Palliative care services
  • Respite care
  • Mental health crisis house
  • Mental health community outreach teams
  • Re-ablement services
  • Schools or children’s education services
  • Substance misuse services
  • Agencies working with domestic abuse
  • Community learning disability services
  • Child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS)
  • Assisted living for people with learning disabilities
  • Older person services
  • Offender support units.

 

Community-Based Organisations and Charities

  • Befriending services e.g. from Befrienders Worldwide (network of centres worldwide provide emotional support and advice)
  • Humanitarian/disaster response agencies e.g. Actionaid
  • Homelessness support services e.g. Shelter (in the UK)
  • Housing support programmes
  • Food banks
  • Accessible transportation services
  • Older people’s support clubs/associations
  • Environmental protection/conservation groups
  • Community sustainability groups
  • Trauma support and advisory services e.g. Unicef, Refuge (in the UK)
  • Children’s homes
  • Youth centres
  • Neighbourhood revitalisation programmes.

Students must keep a ‘Professional Learning and Assessment Document’ portfolio (PLAD) as a means to gather evidence of reflective learning and development on both the Level 4 HNC and Level 5 HND programmes.

In order to work in the care sector, you would require Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance and you will be responsible for arranging this. There will be a charge to obtain DBS clearance to be met by yourself or your employer. You will not get DBS clearance if you have a criminal record and so are unlikely to get employment in the care sector now or in the future. You must declare all criminal convictions to the college otherwise we cannot advise you properly.

10: Calculation of the overall qualification grade

The calculation of the overall qualification grade is based on the student’s performance in all units. Students are awarded a Pass, Merit or Distinction qualification grade using the points gained through all 120 credits, at Level 4 for the HNC or Level 5 for the HND, based on unit achievement. The overall qualification grade is calculated in the same way for the HNC and for the HND.

All units in valid combination must have been attempted for each qualification. All 120 credits count in calculating the grade (at each level, as applicable). The overall qualification grade for the HND will be calculated based on student performance in Level 5 units only.

Units that have been attempted but not achieved, and subsequently granted compensation, will appear as ‘Unclassified’; i.e. a ‘U’ grade, on the student’s Notification of Performance, that is issued with the student certificate.

Points per credit

Pass: 4

Merit: 6

Distinction: 8

Point boundaries

Grade Point boundaries
Pass 420−599
Merit 600−839
Distinction 840 +

 

11: What are the employment and further study opportunities for these qualifications?

Having a BTEC HNC/ HND provides a solid grounding in social and community work which students can build on should they decide to continue their studies beyond the Certificate/ Diploma stage.

On successful completion of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma, students can develop their careers in the social and community care sector through:

  • Entering employment
  • Continuing existing employment
  • Linking with the appropriate Professional Body
  • Committing to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • Progressing to university.

Those who enter employment in the social and community work sector may do so in job roles such as lower managerial, coordinator and supervisory roles in social administration, operation and support services, e.g. information, office, estates, advice and guidance services.

Successful completion of the BTEC HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a related honours degree at a UK university. The qualification is recognised by Higher Education providers (eg. universities) as meeting admission requirements to many relevant social and community work-related courses, including, for example:

  • BA/BSc (Hons) in Social Work
  • BA (Hons) in Social and Community Work
  • BA (Hons) in Youth Work
  • BA (Hons) in Community Development
  • BA (Hons) in Working with Children, Young People and Families
  • BA (Hons) in Social Policy
  • BA (Hons) in Psychology
  • BA (Hons) in International Development
  • BA/BSc (Hons) in Health and Social Care.

Students should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific Higher Education providers where they wish to gain admission and ‘top-up’ their HND.

12: Entry requirements and admissions

The City College is required by Pearson to ensure that every student we enrol has a reasonable expectation of success on the programme. All applicants must be at least 18 years of age.

Applicants aged over 21 years at the start of their course and who have been out of education for at least three years are classed as ‘mature students’. The prior qualifications and/ or work experience of such applicants will be reviewed by the College to consider if their individual profile shows they have the potential to achieve the qualification. If we believe it does and all other requirements of the admissions process are met, such applicants may be enrolled.

For those who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following:

  • A relevant BTEC Level 3 qualification
  • A GCE Advanced Level profile that demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades A* to C and/or 9 to 4 (or equivalent) in subjects such as Maths and English
  • Other related Level 3 qualifications
  • An Access to Higher Education Diploma awarded by an approved further education institution
  • Related work experience
  • An international equivalent of the above.

Applicants for the HND Social and Community Work programme must be in suitable employment before the programme commences in order to be enrolled. The employment may be paid or unpaid – see above for further work experience/ placement requirements.

13: Application process

All applicants must first submit all relevant documents in the following checklist to the College with a completed application form:

  • Completed Application form which has been signed at the back
  • Passport size photo
  • An up-to-date CV
  • Passport or other official photo ID
  • Qualification certificates
  • Next of Kin/ emergency contact phone number and address
  • Proof of address which includes your full name and current address
  • Letter from your employer confirming you are in suitable employment.

After all the documents have been checked, the applicant must sit an entry test as part of the admissions process. If the test is passed, applicants are invited for an interview. After the interview, all components of the process are considered, and the student will be informed of the decision, normally within 48 hours.

Applicants to the HND Social and Community Work programme should note that your employer must be willing to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the college so responsibilities and expectations are agreed and clear (more information about this can be found out by contacting the admin department).

14: English language ability for non-native speakers (not born in the UK)

Non-native English speakers who have not undertaken their final two years of schooling in English, must demonstrate capability in English at Level 2 (or equivalent) before being admitted to the programme. Equivalent grades to Level 2 include CEFR B2, PTE 51, and IELTS 5.5 (reading and writing must be at 5.5).

15: English language ability for non-native speakers who were taught in English for the final two years of school (or more)

Some applicants will not be native-speakers but will have studied the final two years of school in English (eg. those from West Africa).

16: Additional Costs

It is vital that all students have their own up-to-date computer/ laptop and internet for blended learning/assessment/access to online college resources.

All applicants are advised that the fees paid cover the cost of tuition for programme delivery, but there may be additional costs to cover, for example, books if required, stationary, awarding body registration fees, professional body registration fees, and travel costs to events.

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Start On 19/09/2022
Duration HNC - 1 year Full-Time or HND - 2 years Full-Time
Level HNC - LEVEL 4 CERTIFICATE or HND - LEVEL 5 DIPLOMA
Price £6,000 / year
Price

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