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BTEC Higher National Diploma in Hospitality Management

About the course

1: Why choose a BTEC Higher National qualification in Hospitality Management?

The purpose of BTEC Higher National qualifications in Hospitality Management is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals able to meet the demands of employers in the hospitality sector and adapt to a constantly changing world. BTEC Higher Nationals include a Level 4 Certificate (HNC) and a Level 5 Diploma (HND). The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them.

BTEC Higher Nationals are designed to help students secure the knowledge, skills and behaviours needed to succeed in the workplace. They represent the latest in professional standards and provide opportunities for students to develop behaviours for work, for example by undertaking a group project, or responding to a client brief.

At the same time the BTEC Higher Nationals are intended to keep doors open for future study should a student wish to progress further in their education after their level 5 study. They do this by allowing space for the development of higher education study skills, such as the ability to research.

Key Information

Starting DatesJanuary / April / September
Mode of StudyFull-time
DurationHNC – One year / HND – Two years
Awarding BodyPearson
AwardBTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Hospitality Management
BTEC Higher National Diploma in Hospitality Management
PriceFull Time £6,000/year
2: Who are these qualifications for?

The BTEC HNC/ HND in Hospitality Management is aimed at you if you want to continue your education through applied learning! Higher Nationals provide a wide-ranging study of the hospitality sector and are designed for students who wish to pursue or advance their career in hospitality.

In addition to the knowledge, understanding and skills that underpin the study of the hospitality sector, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Hospitality Management give students experience of the breadth and depth of the sector that will prepare them for further study or training.

3: Who awards the qualifications?

The BTEC Higher National qualifications are awarded by Pearson and The City College works in partnership with this organisation to deliver the programme. As the awarding organisation, Pearson has approved The City College to offer a variety of HND qualifications. The College’s management team is then responsible for ensuring that the quality of the provision offered meets Pearson’s exacting conditions and standards.

Quality is monitored regularly through visits from Pearson’s External Examiners and a regular Pearson Annual Management Review.

4: Qualification numbers

The Ofqual Regulated Qualifications Framework (RQF) qualification numbers are as follows:

  • Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Hospitality Management: 603/2279/2
  • Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Hospitality Management: 603/2278/0
5: Why choose BTEC?

BTECs are work-related qualifications for students taking their first steps into employment, or for those already in employment and seeking career development opportunities. BTECs provide progression into the workplace either directly or via study at university and are also designed to meet the needs of employers. Therefore, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals are widely recognised by industry and higher education as the principal vocational qualification at Levels 4 and 5.

6: Aims of the Level 4 HNC and Level 5 HND in Hospitality Management

Holders of the Level 4 HNC will be able to communicate accurately and appropriately and they will have the qualities needed for employment that requires some degree of personal responsibility. They will have developed a range of transferable skills to ensure effective team working, independent initiatives, organisational competence and problem-solving strategies. They will be adaptable and flexible in their approach to hospitality, show resilience under pressure, and meet challenging targets within a given resource.

The programme at Level 5 follows the flexible ‘General Hospitality Management’ pathway.  Holders of the HND will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in their field of study and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. They will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. They will be able to perform effectively in their chosen field and will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

7: Programme Structure

The normal timescale for achieving a Level 4 HNC by full-time study is one-year. The normal timescale for achieving a Level 5 HND by full-time study is two-years. Progression to Year 2 of the programme is dependent on satisfactory completion of Year 1.

The one-year Level 4 HNC:

  • Requires successful completion of 8 units
  • Mixes 5 core and 3 optional units, each with a value of 15 credits (120 total)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 1200 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 480 hours.

The two-year Level 5 HND:

  • Requires successful completion of a further 7 units (therefore 15 in total)
  • Mixes 2 further core units, and 5 optional units, each with a value of 15 credits except the Research Project which is 30 credits (240 total minimum)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 2400 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 960 hours
  • Follows the ‘General Hospitality Management’ pathway.

TQT is an estimate of the total amount of time that could reasonably be expected to be required for a student to achieve and demonstrate the achievement of the level of attainment necessary for the award of a qualification. It can include, for example, guided learning, independent and unsupervised research/ learning, unsupervised coursework, watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar, and unsupervised work-based learning.

GLH are defined as the time when a tutor is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. Guided Learning includes any supervised assessment activity; this includes invigilated examination and observed assessment and observed work-based practice.

The 240 credits achieved by successful completion of the HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a Hospitality related honours degree at a UK university (see section 8 below).

8: What is studied and how is it timetabled and assessed?

The academic year is divided into three terms and in each term you will normally be timetabled to study 2-3 units. You will usually be timetabled for at least three days per week and it must be noted that the timetable changes from term-to-term as the programme develops and units are completed.

A variety of forms of assessment evidence will be used, suited to the type of learning outcomes being assessed. Some units, for example, require a practical demonstration of skills while others require students to carry out their own research and analysis, working independently or as part of a team.

Methods of assessment may include, for example, writing a report or essay, recording an interview or role play, examination or in-class tests, giving a presentation with assessor questioning, making a PowerPoint presentation, creating academic posters, displays or leaflets, or keeping a reflective journal.

Year 1

Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Hospitality Managment
UnitUnit TitleUnit LevelUnit Credit
Core units
Mandatory
1
The Contemporary Hospitality Industry
Unit 1: The Contemporary Hospitality Industry
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to provide students with knowledge and understanding of the hospitality industry. Gaining insight into how hospitality organisations function within the wider business environment.

Students will examine the purpose of different hospitality organisations, exploring the size, scale and scope of the hospitality industry. Students will explore the skills requirements and the challenges that hospitality organisations have with recruiting sufficiently skilled staff to support business growth. Students will consider the external factors that impact the hospitality industry and will gain an understanding of what drives supply and demand for hospitality products and services. Students can then use the knowledge, understanding and skill sets gained in this unit to be able to identify, and take advantage of, potential trends and developments.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Examine the current structure, scope and size of the hospitality industry
2. Explore current and anticipated skills requirements in the hospitality industry
3. Review the internal and external factors that impact the hospitality industry and how they relate to current issues facing the hospitality industry
4. Analyse the current and potential trends and developments affecting the hospitality industry.

415
2
Managing the Customer Experience
Unit 2: Managing the Customer Experience
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to provide students with background knowledge and understanding of how hospitality businesses manage the customer experience from the initial needs analysis through to after sales follow-up.

During the unit, students will be able to map the journey that a customer makes through a hospitality business, identifying crucial touch points and recognising how these touch points can be managed to optimise the customer’s experience.

Students will consider how technology is changing the way customers interact with hospitality businesses and how digital initiatives should complement existing customer journeys whist recognising that online and offline consumers are distinctly different. Students can then use this knowledge to provide customer service both within business and services and on-line contexts to meet required standards.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explain the needs and expectations of market segments for the service industry
2. Explore the customer experience map to create business opportunities and optimise customer touch points
3. Investigate the impacts of digital technology in customer relationship management
4. Apply effective customer experience management within a service sector business to maximise customer engagement.

415
3
Professional Identity and Practice
Unit 3: Professional Identity and Practice
Introduction

With employment opportunities and career progression becoming increasingly competitive, it is vital that new employees appreciate the value of the correct skills and competences expected by employers.

This unit aims to guide students through the process of self-assessment of skills and competences, personal career planning and the application of different learning and development approaches within a work environment. Students are not necessarily expected to engage in work activities, however self-assessment and design must be applied within a specific work context to avoid it being generic. This unit compliments Unit 13: Work experience, to apply theory to practice as content links closely together.

The unit will also give students direction on how to prepare for job applications and interviews in a formalised manner, with the aim to improve career prospects. Students are expected to undertake a practical interview arranged and guided by the tutor or relevant employer.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore the importance of on-going professional development and self-directed learning to enhance professional identity and career opportunities
2. Assess own skills, competences and the different learning and development approaches
3. Design a professional development plan, within a specific work context
4. Demonstrate a range of service industry and transferable skills for a job application.

415
4
The Hospitality Business Toolkit
Unit 4: The Hospitality Business Toolkit
Introduction

Everyone needs to understand the business – not just their own part of it but how all the different aspects link together. The actions of a hospitality manager can have an impact on other areas, and their actions can affect interrelationships with those departments, so students will need to understand all this and be able to take effective, informed decisions.

Many hospitality managers are at ease with the customer service side of the hospitality business, but are less comfortable diving into the financial side of things. Yet to be a successful hospitality manager, you must know how to control your department or property’s finances responsibly and effectively. Every business requires its future leaders to have a level of understanding of key factors to drive both profitability and brand success. Using tools such as human capital, planning to recruit and retain the best staff, to interpreting and applying financial key indicators to drive profitability or gain market share.

This unit is designed to provide students with key skills for becoming competent managers in a hospitality environment. Allowing them to understand key principles with regard to key performance indicators both financial and non-financial.

This unit aims to give students the opportunity to develop their business acumen, covering a number of different business activities applied within the hospitality industry context. These include forecasting and budgeting, interpreting financial statements, recruitment and retention of staff, effective communication and dealing with legislation and regulation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Investigate how to manage finance and record transactions to minimise costs responsibly within the hospitality sector
2. Assess how to manage the Human Resources (HR) life cycle within the context of HR strategy
3. Illustrate the potential impact of the legal and ethical considerations on a hospitality business
4. Explain the importance of coordinating and integrating various functions of departments within the hospitality sector.

415
5
Leadership and Management for Service Industries
Unit 5: Leadership and Management for Service Industries
Introduction

The ability to lead and manage effectively is highly sought after by service industry employers as they seek to produce and develop managers that can motivate, enthuse and build respect throughout their workforce.

This unit is a Pearson-set unit. Tutors will choose a topic based on a theme and selection of topics provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The unit will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of leadership and management in the context of the service sector environment.

This unit also enables students to gain understanding of leadership and management principles, and to review their potential for a career in management in the service sector. After exploring organisations’ structures and cultures they will learn classical management theories and leadership styles and how these are applied to managing commercial organisations.

In addition to the students gaining a good understanding of how management theories are practiced in today’s industries they will evaluate effective management and leadership skills for the service industries through application and reflection on skills required and applied in a service industry context.

*Please refer to the accompanying Pearson-set Assignment Guide and Theme and Topic Release document for further support and guidance on the delivery of the Pearson-set unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Review classical management theories and leadership styles
2. Explore the factors that influence different management styles and structures in a service industry context
3. Assess current and future management and leadership skills for the service sector
4. Demonstrate management and leadership skills in a service industry context.

415
Plus TWO optional units from Group A and ONE from Group B (chosen by the College)
GROUP A
Plus TWO
optional units
from Group A
and ONE from
Group B (chosen
by the College)
6
Managing Food and Beverage Operations
Unit 6: Managing Food and Beverage Operations
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to provide students with background and operational knowledge of the food and beverage industry. Students will examine the different kind of businesses found within the hospitality sector and the standards associated with them.

Students will be expected to learn the operational skills required to work within the food and beverage sector and gain an appreciation for the equipment and technology used in operations. Students will learn how they can gain commercial advantage both operationally and from a marketing perspective. Finally, students will also learn about which factors effect customer’s decision to purchase. Students will be able to use this knowledge as a foundation to develop a career in food and beverage management.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explore the food and beverage industry including different styles of food and beverage service outlets, rating systems and current industry trends
2. Demonstrate professional food and beverage service standards in a real working environment
3. Compare the ways that different food and beverage operations use technology to improve operational efficiency
4. Analyse customer motivations and behaviour and how food service outlets use this information to maximise business success.

415
7
Managing Accommodation Services
Unit 7: Managing Accommodation Services
Introduction

The accommodation sector is one of the largest sectors in the tourist industry, providing a wealth of opportunities for students to work within a dynamic and diverse sector. Opportunities are growing for accelerated career advancement, and positions in differing destinations and different types of establishments are expanding.

The sector is an integral part of the hospitality industry and this unit will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the diverse accommodation services available to guests. Students will gain an overview of accommodation services, the different forms of ownership and classification systems. The functions of the front office will be introduced and they will explore the role the front office plays within accommodation services. The importance of housekeeping management will also be assessed along with the facilities and security functions of accommodation services.

Students will be able to identify trends and technologies for the sector and the impact they have on the different functions, services and guest provisions.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Explain the types of accommodation services available within the hospitality industry
2. Discuss the role of the Front Office department within accommodation services
3. Assess the contribution of the Housekeeping department to providing effective accommodation services
4. Explore the role facilities and security plays within accommodation services.

415
8
Managing Conference and Events
Unit 8: Managing Conference and Events
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to give students a background knowledge and understanding of the events and conferencing industry. Students will be required to study the different types of events and profile real events from different events categories.

Students will learn how to set up a variety of conferences and the type of equipment and resources required to set up conferences and events. Students will discover the different job roles in the events industry and the skills required for the roles. Students will evaluate their own skills to identify what they need to improve on to gain their desired roles.

Students will investigate the criteria required to run and manage a safe and secure event, both in terms of the physical venue and dealing with situations that might occur. On completion of the unit students will have a good understanding of the industry and the skills required and transferable skills in safety, which is invaluable for any area of the events sector.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Investigate the different categories and dimensions of events within the events sector
2. Examine the considerations for conference and event room set ups defining the professional standards required
3. Explore the management skills required to work within the events environment and successfully deal with stakeholders
4. Explain the measures required to manage a secure and safe events environment for staff and guests.

415
GROUP B
13
Work Experience
Unit 13: Work Experience
Introduction

A crucial part of a professional’s skills, abilities and competences are developed during work, and are refined through practical experiences and ‘learning by doing’. Employers rate work experience above all else and the HN qualifications aim to make students work ready and prepare them with the appropriate balanced skills profile that employers require.

Integral to achieving ‘work readiness’ is the need for practical application and contextualisation of learning; a perspective that is increasingly sought after by employers. Curriculum that helps students gain real-world, relevant experience in their chosen careers have proven to be an enabler for graduate progression to employment and of considerable value to students’ personal and professional development.

This unit aims to enable students to develop personal and professional skills by engaging in practical tasks and activities within a relevant workplace. It is designed to facilitate supervised learning in a workplace that can be fit around full-time or part-time student commitments and enables both an employer as well as an academic supervisor to monitor and support students through a goal-orientated process. The minimum work experience hours required for completion is 80 hours.

Students will be given the opportunity to identify and plan their own skills development in line with a chosen career path or direction. It will be expected that students negotiate and agree work experience in an appropriate work context, agreed by the employer and academic supervisor. They will monitor and record evidence from the tasks and activities that they undertake, to allow them to evaluate the process and any shortcomings in their development going forward.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Investigate the value and benefits of practical work experience for career and personal development
2. Plan suitable and relevant work experience in an appropriate service sector organisation
3. Undertake appropriate work experience to develop professional skills and competences
4. Evaluate personal skills and competences developed during practical work experiences.

415
15
Hospitality Marketing Essentials
Unit 15: Hospitality Marketing Essentials
Introduction

This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles of marketing, enabling them to develop a basic marketing plan and to employ elements of the marketing mix to achieve results. While they will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, they will also be able to relate these to real-world examples, including products/services that they encounter in their own daily lives.

Hospitality organisations such as Hilton, Accor, McDonalds, Costa Coffee and small local businesses all have at least one thing in common: they all use marketing to influence us to engage with their products and/or services. Whether it is becoming a loyal customer buying a product and service or donating to a charity, organisations use a range of marketing techniques and tools to inform and influence us.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up their own business or being employed by an organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Explain the role of marketing and how it interrelates with other functional units in a hospitality organisation
2. Compare ways in which hospitality organisations use elements of the marketing mix (7Ps) to achieve overall business objectives
3. Develop a basic marketing plan to meet marketing objectives for a hospitality organisation.

415
16
Human Resource Management
Unit 9: Human Resource Management
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to enable students to appreciate and apply principles of effective Human Resource Management (HRM). People are the lifeblood of any organisation and being able to attract, recruit and retain talented staff is at the core of all HRM activity. This unit will explore the tools and techniques used in HRM to maximise the employee contribution and how to use Human Resource (HR) methods to gain competitive advantage. Students will explore the importance of training and development in building and extending the skills base of the organisation and ensuring it is relevant to the ever-changing business environment. Students will also consider the growing importance of becoming a flexible organisation with an equally flexible labour force, and become familiar with techniques of job design and with different reward systems.

The unit investigates the importance of good employee relations and the ways in which employers engage with their staff and possibly with trade unions. Students will gain an understanding of the law governing HRM processes as well as the best practices which enable an employer to become an ‘employer of choice’ in their labour market.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Explain the purpose and scope of Human Resource Management in terms of resourcing an organisation with talent and skills appropriate to fulfil business objectives
2. Evaluate the effectiveness of the key elements of Human Resource Management in an organisation
3. Analyse internal and external factors that affect Human Resource Management decision-making, including employment legislation
4. Apply Human Resource Management practices in a work-related context.

415
17
Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
Unit 17: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
Introduction

This unit provides students with an understanding of the definition and scope of entrepreneurship and an understanding of the enablers and barriers to business start-up.

Students will learn about the influence of national culture and economy on entrepreneurship and will explore the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs and the impact of personal situational factors, including education and background. Students will also learn about the role and importance of small firms to the economy, and about social enterprise and the social economy. Students will also be expected to understand the balance of risk and reward in starting a new venture and they will investigate and reflect on their own entrepreneurial and enterprising characteristics. Examples of entrepreneurs and start-up organisations will be discussed and students will be expected to draw on local, personal and general knowledge together with their learning to be able to identify the characteristics of entrepreneurial ventures.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Explore and illustrate the range of venture types that might be considered entrepreneurial
2. Assess the impact of small businesses on the economy
3. Determine and assess the key aspects of an entrepreneurial mindset 4. Examine the different environments that foster or hinder entrepreneurship.

415

 

Year 2

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Hospitality Managment
UnitSpecialist unitsUnit LevelUnit Credit
Core units
Mandatory
18
Research Project (Pearson-set)
Unit 18: Research Project (Pearson-set)
Introduction

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. Students will choose their own project based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The project must be related to their specialist pathway of study (unless the student is studying the general business pathway). This will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of hospitality in the context of the hospitality environment and their chosen specialist pathway.

The aim of this unit is to offer students the opportunity to engage in sustained research in a specific field of study. The unit enables students to demonstrate the capacity and ability to identify a research theme, to develop research aims, objectives and outcomes, and to present the outcomes of such research in both written and verbal formats. The unit also encourages students to reflect on their engagement in the research process during which recommendations for future, personal development are key learning points.

On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in problem-solving and research activities which are part of the function of a manager. Students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate workplace issues and problems, determine appropriate solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format.

*Please refer to the accompanying Pearson-set Assignment Guide and the Theme Release document for further support and guidance on the delivery of the Pearson-set unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Examine appropriate research methodologies and approaches as part of the research process
2. Conduct and analyse research relevant to a service industry research project
3. Communicate the outcomes of a service industry research project to identified stakeholders
4. Reflect on the application of research methodologies and concepts.

530
19
Hospitality Consumer Behaviour and Insight
Unit 19: Hospitality Consumer Behaviour and Insight
Introduction

Creating memories and joyous experiences for consumers is a key dimension affecting the profitability and growth of any hospitality organisation. To understand the factors that influence customers’ decisions is invaluable in marketing and hospitality operations.

This unit is designed to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of the consumer’s decision-making processes, from needs recognition through research, the evaluation of alternatives, purchase and post-purchase evaluation. While students will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, they will also be expected to relate these to real-world examples, including their own personal experiences.

An important part of marketing is understanding the processes behind how a consumer makes the decision to purchase a product and/or service.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up in business independently or being employed by a hospitality organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Examine the factors that influence hospitality consumer behaviour and attitudes
2. Demonstrate the ability to map a path to purchase in a hospitality context, including the decision-making process
3. Evaluate appropriate forms of research to understand influences on the hospitality consumer decision-making process
4. Evaluate how marketers influence the different stages of the hospitality consumer decision-making process.

515
Plus FIVE specialist/ optional units (chosen by the College) from the list below

Plus FIVE
specialist/
optional units
(chosen by the
ollege)
21
Menu Development, Planning and Design
Unit 21: Menu Development, Planning and Design
Introduction

The menu in any hospitality business is not only the prime method of communicating to customers what it is they have to sell, but it is also the key document for directing and controlling the business. The menu provides a road map for what ingredients need to be purchased, the price a business can pay for those ingredients, and the staff, equipment and procedures required to produce the dishes.

In this unit students will be investigating how menus are planned and designed to meet customer requirements within the resource, skills and cost constraints of a hospitality business. Students will understand how to apply these principles to developing and designing profitable and achievable menus and how to evaluate their impact on customers and the business.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Investigate how menus are planned and designed to meet customer and business requirements
2. Determine how to cost and price menus
3. Develop and evaluate menus to meet customer and business requirements.

515
27
Front Office Operations Management
Unit 27: Front Office Operations Management
Introduction

The Front Office multi-departmental operations of a hotel play a crucial role in the customer experience; they meet and greet guests, check them in, manage their luggage and ensure that they have a comfortable and enjoyable stay. The Front Office is the face of the accommodation sector and has an invaluable role in elevating and enhancing the customer experience and relationship.

The aim of this unit is to provide students with the understanding of how the hotel Front Office is managed and its importance within accommodation services.

This unit will explore the Front Office and students will learn about the day-to-day management of the Front Office. Students will gain an understanding of what is involved in each phase of the guest experience as well as an understanding of room sales revenue and the importance of yield management in maximising revenue.

On successful completion of this unit students will have developed sufficient knowledge and understanding of what it takes to manage the Front Office.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Evaluate the role of the Front Office department within various accommodation organisations
2. Discuss the importance of managing the reservation process to ensure maximisation of profit
3. Analyse the guest experience journey within Front Office operations
4. Assess how Front Office operations manage the quality of service delivery.

515
31
Hospitality Digital Marketing
Unit 31: Hospitality Digital Marketing
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to introduce students to the major developments taking place in digital marketing. It will enable students to develop an understanding of how hospitality organisations use various digital tools and techniques to engage their guests/customers and maintain a competitive advantage. This unit is designed to provide students with the knowledge and tools to work as part of a digital marketing team or go on to study more in this specific area.

Digital marketing is now a major component of all successful hospitality marketing campaigns. Hospitality organisations recognise the importance of having digital at the core of their business in order to meet the needs of technology-savvy guests/customers.

However, with the landscape continually evolving, it is important for marketers to stay ahead of their competitors and deliver cutting-edge digital marketing approaches and strategies.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the opportunities, challenges and impact of the digital environment within the hospitality industry
2. Examine key digital tools, platforms and channels used by various hospitality organisations
3. Determine how to organise digital marketing activities and build multi-channel capabilities in a hospitality organisation
4. Evaluate methods of monitoring and measuring digital marketing effectively.

515
36
Diet and Nutrition
Unit 36: Diet and Nutrition
Introduction

Through the subject of nutrition students will determine how the intake of food can have a serious impact on health and well-being. Students will develop their knowledge of essential nutritional principles such as macro and micro nutrients, dietary requirements, hydration and effects of diet on health and disease.

Students will master specialised subjects such as food allergies and intolerances, eating disorders, diet related illnesses and nutritional requirements throughout all stages of life. Legislation and regulations will be explored along with the understanding of nutritional food labelling.

This unit will enable students to create and critically analyse recipes and menus, covering a variety of hospitality sectors and an array of dietary requirements.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of nutrients and calories, their sources and their effect, on health and well-being
2. Evaluate the impact of nutritional knowledge in relation to hospitality management
3. Examine the implications of nutrition in relation to specific diseases, digestive disorders and key stages of life
4. Discuss menu planning for specialist diets including allergies and intolerance, cultural and ethnic food requirements and plant-based diets.

515
39
Tourist Resort Management
Unit 39: Tourist Resort Management
Introduction

The purpose of this unit is to give students an opportunity to explore the world of tourist resorts. Firstly, they will learn about the different types of resorts that exist in the world and focus on some of the management issues that are associated with managing them. Secondly, the students will focus on understanding the difference between an all-inclusive resort and an individually priced resort and the financial challenges that this brings.

Finally students will be expected to focus on a specific location of their choosing, they will then research a specific resort type of their choice and identify the type of customers that visit the location and why. Focusing on the consumer needs, students are then to produce a creative package tailored to the resort, outlining how the resort would be priced ensuring that the business would be profitable and how it would win business against local competition.

Students will be able to use the knowledge gained during this unit to help in a career as a general hotel manager or business entrepreneur.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:
1. Examine the different features of common resorts and the potential issues of managing them
2. Evaluate the different types of resorts and the packages available
3. Analyse the consumer needs in a specific location to create a resort package that focuses on these needs
4. Apply the guiding principles for achieving sustainable tourism for a chosen resort.

515
42
Customer Value Management
Unit 42: Customer Value Management
Introduction

This unit is designed to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of why it is important for marketers to enhance and manage the value of the customer interactions. Students will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, and will also be expected to relate these to real-world examples, including their own personal experiences.

Organisations ideally seek a mutually beneficial relationship between themselves and their customers. This is particularly important when considering the costs associated with acquiring a new customer. It has been suggested that it can cost five times as much to gain a new customer as it is to retain an existing one. Moreover, there is no guarantee that a new customer will be as loyal as a current one. Any organisation, whether for profit, non profit organisation (NGO) or a charity, seeks ways of retaining customers through enhanced customer experiences.

In order to retain loyal (and profitable) customers, organisations seek to understand them better. By understanding customers through the capture of relevant data, organisations can enhance a customer’s lifetime value. They then aim to build a relationship with the customers where they remain loyal and continue to purchase a range of products/services.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up in business independently or being employed by an organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of customer lifetime value, how to calculate it and the different factors that influence it
2. Evaluate the different segments in a customer base and the appropriate opportunities for customer value creation
3. Analyse appropriate techniques and methods in order to increase customer lifetime value.

415
43
Organisational Behaviour
Unit 43: Organisational Behaviour
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to develop a student’s understanding of the influence culture, politics and power have on the behaviour of others in an organisational context. Students will be in a position to apply the principles of organisational behaviour to a variety of business situations.

On successful completion of this unit students will have an understanding and awareness of key influences which affect the behaviour of individuals, teams and organisations as a whole. They will be able to use this knowledge to make an immediate and positive contribution in the workplace, whether that role is as part of a team or as a team leader. This will be achieved through a strong appreciation of working in a team, having a more profound perspective of what makes people and organisations do what they do, and how to adjust one’s own behaviour to reflect the circumstances and situation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Analyse the influence of culture, politics and power on the behaviour of others in an organisational context
2. Evaluate how to motivate individuals and teams to achieve a goal
3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to cooperate effectively with others
4. Apply concepts and philosophies of organisational behaviour to a given business situation.

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46
Managing and Running a Small Business
Unit 46: Managing and Running a Small Business
Introduction

This unit will provide students with a practical understanding of the key aspects of running a small business or social enterprise. Students will learn about the activities involved in running a small business, including developing good relationships with customers, planning and allocating operational resources, forecasting and budgeting, interpreting financial statements, recruitment and retention of staff, leadership and building a team, dealing with legislation and regulation and how to put together a business plan.

Students will be able to apply their learning to a simulated business of their choice that they will work on as part of a group. They will develop an understanding of how all of the different aspects of running a business interrelate to achieve success, and develop an appreciation of the benefits and importance of organisation and planning.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1. Discuss how a small business or social enterprise plans and allocates resources to achieve objectives
2. Explain and evaluate the customer relationship management process for a small business or social enterprise, including understanding the benefits and challenges of transnational operation
3. Develop and analyse a cash flow forecast, budget and break-even analysis and interpret key financial statements
4. Discuss the implications of regulation and legislation on a small business or social enterprise.

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9: Calculation of the overall qualification grade

The calculation of the overall qualification grade is based on the student’s performance in all units. Students are awarded a Pass, Merit or Distinction qualification grade using the points gained through all 120 credits, at Level 4 for the HNC or Level 5 for the HND, based on unit achievement. The overall qualification grade is calculated in the same way for the HNC and for the HND.

All units in valid combination must have been attempted for each qualification. All 120 credits count in calculating the grade (at each level, as applicable). The overall qualification grade for the HND will be calculated based on student performance in Level 5 units only.

Units that have been attempted but not achieved, and subsequently granted compensation, will appear as ‘Unclassified’; i.e. a ‘U’ grade, on the student’s Notification of Performance, that is issued with the student certificate.

Points per credit

Pass: 4

Merit: 6

Distinction: 8

Point boundaries

GradePoint boundaries
Pass 420−599
Merit 600−839
Distinction 840 +

 

10: What are the employment and further study opportunities for these qualifications?

Having a BTEC HNC/ HND provides a solid grounding in hospitality, which students can build on should they decide to continue their studies beyond the Certificate/ Diploma stage.

On successful completion of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma, students can develop their careers in the hospitality sector through:

  • Entering employment
  • Continuing existing employment
  • Linking with the appropriate Professional Body
  • Linking with the appropriate industry certificates
  • Committing to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • Progressing to university.

Those who enter employment in the hospitality sector may do so in job roles such as:

  • Assistant General Manager
  • Duty Manager
  • Assistant Hospitality Manager
  • Hospitality Customer Relationships Manager.

Successful completion of the BTEC HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a related honours degree at a UK university. The qualification is recognised by Higher Education providers (eg. universities) as meeting admission requirements to many relevant hospitality-related courses, including, for example:

  • BSc (Hons) in Hospitality and Events Management
  • BA and BSc (Hons) in Culinary Arts Management
  • BSc (Hons) in International Hospitality Management.

Students should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific Higher Education providers where they wish to gain admission and ‘top-up’ their HND.

11: Entry requirements and admissions

The City College is required by Pearson to ensure that every student we enrol has a reasonable expectation of success on the programme. All applicants must be at least 18 years of age.

Applicants aged over 21 years at the start of their course and who have been out of education for at least three years are classed as ‘mature students’. The prior qualifications and/ or work experience of such applicants will be reviewed by the College to consider if their individual profile shows they have the potential to achieve the qualification. If we believe it does and all other requirements of the admissions process are met, such applicants may be enrolled.

For those who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following:

  • A relevant BTEC Level 3 qualification
  • A GCE Advanced Level profile that demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades A* to C and/or 9 to 4 (or equivalent) in subjects such as Maths and English
  • Other related Level 3 qualifications
  • An Access to Higher Education Diploma awarded by an approved further education institution
  • Related work experience
  • An international equivalent of the above.
12: Application process

All applicants must first submit all relevant documents in the following checklist to the College with a completed application form:

  • Completed Application form which has been signed at the back
  • Passport size photo
  • An up-to-date CV
  • Passport or other form of photo ID
  • Qualification certificates
  • Next of Kin/ emergency contact phone number and address
  • Proof of address which includes your full name and current address.

After all the documents have been checked, the applicant must sit an entry test as part of the admissions process. If the test is passed, applicants are invited for an interview. After the interview, all components of the process are considered, and the student will be informed of the decision, normally within 48 hours.

13: English language ability for non-native speakers (not born in the UK)

Non-native English speakers who have not undertaken their final two years of schooling in English, must demonstrate capability in English at Level 2 (or equivalent) before being admitted to the programme. Equivalent grades to Level 2 include CEFR B2, PTE 51, and IELTS 5.5 (reading and writing must be at 5.5). After gaining admittance, such students are still encouraged to enrol on the Level 2 English course because it should still help with their HND study, career development or further study.

14: English language ability for non-native speakers who were taught in English for the final two years of school (or more)

Some applicants will not be native-speakers but will have studied the final two years of school in English (eg. those from West Africa). These applicants are also encouraged to enrol on the Level 2 English course, either as a useful refresher or because it should help them with career development or further study (eg. university entrance).

Applicants will need to prove they have any qualifications claimed and that they studied in English. If any examination certificates have been lost, applicants should apply for new copies or provide a letter from their school/ college, or provide some other proof of their educational history, so the details can be verified.

15: English language ability for native speakers (born in UK)

All applicants are encouraged to enrol on the Level 2 English course, even if they already have an appropriate English qualification. This is because it is a good refresher course for those who have perhaps been away from education for a while, and because it should prove helpful with career development or further study (eg. university entrance). If they don’t have an English qualification or can’t prove what they claim, the same applies.

 

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1 review for BTEC Higher National Diploma in Hospitality Management

  1. 5 out of 5

    :

    Hello dear,

    I would like to get place that course in September 2018.

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Start On 17/09/2018
Duration HNC - 1 year
HND - 2 years
Level Certificate
Diploma
Price £6,000 / year

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