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BTEC Higher National Diploma in Business (Management)

About the course

1: Why choose a BTEC Higher National qualification in Business?

The purpose of BTEC Higher National qualifications in Business is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals who are able to meet the demands of employers in the business sector and adapt to a constantly changing world. BTEC Higher Nationals include a Level 4 Certificate (HNC) and a Level 5 Diploma (HND). The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them.

 The BTEC Higher National qualifications are awarded by Pearson and The City College works in partnership with this organisation to deliver the programme. As the awarding organisation, Pearson has approved The City College to offer a variety of HND qualifications. The College’s management team is then responsible for ensuring that the quality of the provision offered meets Pearson’s exacting conditions and standards.

Quality is monitored regularly through visits from Pearson’s External Examiners and a regular Pearson Annual Management Review.

Key Information

Starting DatesJanuary / April / September
Mode of StudyFull-time 
DurationHNC – One year / HND – Two years
Awarding BodyPearson
AwardBTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Business
BTEC HND Diploma in Business & Management
PriceFull Time £6,000/year
2: Who are these qualifications for?

The BTEC HNC/ HND in Business is aimed at you if you want to continue your education through applied learning! Higher Nationals provide a wide-ranging study of the business sector and are designed for students who wish to pursue or advance their career in business.

In addition to the knowledge, understanding and skills that underpin the study of the business sector, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Business give students experience of the breadth and depth of the sector that will prepare them for further study or training.

3: Why choose BTEC?

BTECs are work-related qualifications for students taking their first steps into employment, or for those already in employment and seeking career development opportunities. BTECs provide progression into the workplace either directly or via study at university and are also designed to meet the needs of employers. Therefore, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals are widely recognised by industry and higher education as the principal vocational qualification at Levels 4 and 5.

4: Aims of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Business

Holders of the BTEC HNC/ HND in Business will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in their field of study and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. They will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. They will be able to perform effectively in their chosen field and will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

5: Programme structure

The normal timescale for achieving a Level 4 HNC by full-time study is one-year. The normal timescale for achieving a Level 5 HND by full-time study is two-years. Progression to Year 2 of the programme is dependent on satisfactory completion of Year 1.

The one-year Level 4 HNC:

  • Requires successful completion of 8 units
  • Mixes 6 core and 2 optional units, each with a value of 15 credits (120 total)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 1200 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 480 hours
  • Follows the General Business pathway.

The two-year Level 5 HND:

  • Requires successful completion of a further 7 units (therefore 15 in total)
  • Mixes 2 core, 3 specialist and 2 optional units, each with a value of 15 credits except the Research Project which is 30 credits (240 total minimum)
  • Total Qualification Time (TQT) is 2400 hours
  • Total Guided Learning Hours (GLH) is 960 hours
  • Follows the Business Management specialist pathway.

TQT is an estimate of the total amount of time that could reasonably be expected to be required for a student to achieve and demonstrate the achievement of the level of attainment necessary for the award of a qualification. It can include, for example, guided learning, independent and unsupervised research/ learning, unsupervised coursework, watching a pre-recorded podcast or webinar, and unsupervised work-based learning.

GLH are defined as the time when a tutor is present to give specific guidance towards the learning aim being studied on a programme. This definition includes lectures, tutorials and supervised study in, for example, open learning centres and learning workshops. Guided Learning includes any supervised assessment activity; this includes invigilated examination and observed assessment and observed work-based practice.

The 240 credits achieved by successful completion of the HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a Business-related honours degree at a UK university (see section 8 below).

6: What is studied and how is it timetabled and assessed?

The academic year is divided into three terms and in each term you will normally be timetabled to study 2-3 units. You will usually be timetabled for at least three days per week and it must be noted that the timetable changes from term-to-term as the programme develops and units are completed.

A variety of forms of assessment evidence will be used, suited to the type of learning outcomes being assessed. Some units, for example, require a practical demonstration of skills while others require students to carry out their own research and analysis, working independently or as part of a team.

Methods of assessment may include, for example, writing a report or essay, recording an interview or role play, examination or in-class tests, giving a presentation with assessor questioning, making a PowerPoint presentation, creating academic posters, displays or leaflets, or keeping a reflective journal.

Year 1

Pearson BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate in Business
UnitUnit TitleUnit LevelUnit Credit
Core unit Mandatory1
Business and the Business Environment
Unit 1: Business and the Business Environment
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to provide students with background knowledge and understanding of business, the functions of an organisation and the wider business environments in which organisations operate. Students will examine the different types of organisations (including for profit and not for profit), their size and scope (for instance, micro, SME, transnational and global) and how they operate.

Students will explore the relationships that organisations have with their various stakeholders and how the wider external environments influence and shape business decision-making.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets gained in this unit will help students to choose their own preferred areas of specialism in future studies and in their professional career.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Explain the different types, size and scope of organisations.
2 Demonstrate the interrelationship of the various functions within an organisation and how they link to organisational structure.
3 Use contemporary examples to demonstrate both the positive and negative influence/impact the macro environment has on business operations.
4 Determine the internal strengths and weaknesses of specific businesses and explain their interrelationship with external macro factors.

415
2
Marketing Essentials
Unit 2: Marketing Essentials
Introduction

This unit is designed to introduce students to the principles of marketing, enabling them to develop a basic marketing plan and to employ elements of the marketing mix to achieve results. While they will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, they will also be able to relate these to real-world examples, including products/services that they encounter in their own daily lives.

Organisations such as Apple, Google, VISA, Burberry, Zara, Cadbury, Nestle, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Unicef, BP and small local businesses all have at least one thing in common: they all use marketing to influence us to engage with their products and/or services. Whether it is becoming a loyal customer buying a product and service or donating to a charity, organisations use a range of marketing techniques and tools to inform and influence us.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up their own business or being employed by an organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Explain the role of marketing and how it interrelates with other functional units of an organisation.
2 Compare ways in which organisations use elements of the marketing mix (7Ps) to achieve overall business objectives.
3 Develop and evaluate a basic marketing plan.

415
3
Human Resource Management
Unit 3: Human Resource Management
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to enable students to appreciate and apply principles of effective Human Resource Management (HRM). People are the lifeblood of any organisation and being able to attract, recruit and retain talented staff is at the core of all HRM activity. This unit will explore the tools and techniques used in HRM to maximise the employee contribution and how to use HR methods to gain competitive advantage. Students will explore the importance of training and development in building and extending the skills base of the organisation and ensuring it is relevant to the ever-changing business environment. Students will also consider the growing importance of becoming a flexible organisation with an equally flexible labour force, and become familiar with techniques of job design and with different reward systems.
The unit investigates the importance of good employee relations and the ways in which employers engage with their staff and possibly with trade unions. Students will gain an understanding of the law governing HRM processes as well as the best practices which enable an employer to become an ‘employer of choice’ in their labour market.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Explain the purpose and scope of Human Resource Management in terms of resourcing an organisation with talent and skills appropriate to fulfil business objectives.
2 Evaluate the effectiveness of the key elements of Human Resource Management in an organisation.
3 Analyse internal and external factors that affect Human Resource Management decision-making, including employment legislation.
4 Apply Human Resource Management practices in a work-related context.

415
4
Management and Operations
Unit 4: Management and Operations
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to help students understand the difference between the function of a manager and the role of a leader. Students will consider the characteristics, behaviours and traits which support effective management and leadership. In addition, this unit will introduce the concept of operations as both a function and a process which all organisations must adopt to conduct business. Students will be introduced to contemporary and historical theories and concepts which will support their learning for this unit.

On successful completion of this unit students will have developed sufficient knowledge and understanding of how management and operations make a positive, efficient and effective contribution to an organisation at a junior level. This could be in the role of a team leader or managing a specific aspect of an operation function and/or process.

Underpinning all aspects of the content for this unit you will consider topics under two broad headings: management and operations.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Differentiate between the role of a leader and the function of a manager.
2 Apply the role of a leader and the function of a manager in given contexts.
3 Demonstrate an appreciation of the role leaders and managers play in the operations function of an organisation.
4 Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between leadership and management in a contemporary business environment.

415
5
Management Accounting
Unit 5: Management Accounting
Introduction

The overall aim of this unit is to introduce the fundamentals of management accounting which apply to the wider business environment and the organisations which operate within that environment. Students will explore how management accounting uses financial data to aid planning decisions, and the monitoring and control of finance within organisations.

On successful completion of this unit students will be in a position to present financial statements in a workplace context and be able to assist senior colleagues with financial business planning. In addition, students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to progress onto a higher level of study.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Demonstrate an understanding of management accounting systems.
2 Apply a range of management accounting techniques.
3 Explain the use of planning tools used in management accounting.
4 Compare ways in which organisations could use management accounting to respond to financial problems.

415
6
Managing a Successful Business Project
Unit 6: Managing a Successful Business Project
Introduction

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. The project brief will be set by the centre, based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The theme and chosen project within the theme will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of business in the context of the business environment.

The aim of this unit is to offer students an opportunity to demonstrate the skills required for managing and implementing a project. They will undertake independent research and investigation for carrying out and executing a business project which meets appropriate business aims and objectives.

On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in decision-making, problem-solving and research activities using project management skills. They will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate and examine relevant business concepts within a work-related context, determine appropriate outcomes, decisions or solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Establish project aims, objectives and timeframes based on the chosen theme.
2 Conduct small-scale research, information gathering and data collection to generate knowledge to support the project.
3 Present the project and communicate appropriate recommendations based on meaningful conclusions drawn from the evidence findings and/or analysis.
4 Reflect on the value gained from conducting the project and its usefulness to support sustainable organisational performance.

415
Optional unit7
Business Law
Unit 7: Business Law
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to enhance students’ understanding of how business law is applied to the running of a company. Students will gain knowledge of business law and examine the impact of the law on business operations and decision-making. Throughout the unit students will identify legal solutions available to business owners and assess their suitability. Their experiences in this unit will help them better understand the areas of law in which they will want to specialise. They will be able to illustrate the impact of the law on normal business operations and when registering a company and inviting shareholders to invest in it. They will gain an understanding of the law in relation to market abuse and director responsibilities. Students will be able to recognise the application of employment law between employers and employees.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Explain the basic nature of the legal system.
2 Illustrate the potential impact of the law on a business.
3 Examine the formation of different types of business organisations.
4 Recommend appropriate legal solutions based upon alternative legal advice provided.

415
9
Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
Unit 9: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
Introduction

This unit provides students with an understanding of the definition and scope of entrepreneurship and an understanding of the enablers and barriers to business start-up.

Students will learn about the influence of national culture and economy on entrepreneurship and will explore the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs and the impact of personal situational factors, including education and background. Students will also learn about the role and importance of small firms to the economy, and about social enterprise and the social economy. Students will also be expected to understand the balance of risk and reward in starting a new venture and they will investigate and reflect on their own entrepreneurial and enterprising characteristics. Examples of entrepreneurs and start-up organisations will be discussed and students will be expected to draw on local, personal and general knowledge together with their learning to be able to identify the characteristics of entrepreneurial ventures.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Explore and illustrate the range of venture types that might be considered entrepreneurial.
2 Assess the impact of small businesses on the economy.
3 Determine and assess the key aspects of an entrepreneurial mindset.
4 Examine the different environments that foster or hinder entrepreneurship.

415

 

Year 2

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Business (Management)
UnitUnit TitleUnit LevelUnit Credit
Core unit Mandatory11
Research Project
Unit 11: Research Project
Introduction

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. Students will choose their own project based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The project must be related to their specialist pathway of study (unless the student is studying the general business pathway). This will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of business in the context of the business environment and their chosen specialist pathway.

The aim of this unit is to offer students the opportunity to engage in sustained research in a specific field of study. The unit enables students to demonstrate the capacity and ability to identify a research theme, to develop research aims, objectives and outcomes, and to present the outcomes of such research in both written and verbal formats. The unit also encourages students to reflect on their engagement in the research process during which recommendations for future, personal development are key learning points.

On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in problem-solving and research activities which are part of the function of a manager. Students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate workplace issues and problems, determine appropriate solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Examine appropriate research methodologies and approaches as part of the research process.
2 Conduct and analyse research relevant to a business research project.
3 Communicate the outcomes of a research project to identified stakeholders.
4 Reflect on the application of research methodologies and concepts.

530
12
Organisational Behaviour
Unit 12: Organisational Behaviour
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to develop a student’s understanding of the influence culture, politics and power have on the behaviour of others in an organisational context. Students will be in a position to apply the principles of organisational behaviour to a variety of business situations.

On successful completion of this unit students will have an understanding and awareness of key influences which affect the behaviour of individuals, teams and organisations as a whole. They will be able to use this knowledge to make an immediate and positive contribution in the workplace, whether that role is as part of a team or as a team leader. This will be achieved through a strong appreciation of working in a team, having a more profound perspective of what makes people and organisations do what they do, and how to adjust one’s own behaviour to reflect the circumstances and situation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Analyse the influence of culture, politics and power on the behaviour of others in an organisational context.
2 Evaluate how to motivate individuals and teams to achieve a goal.
3 Demonstrate an understanding of how to cooperate effectively with others.
4 Apply concepts and philosophies of organisational behaviour to a given business situation.

515
Specialist unit
Mandatory
16
Operations and Project Management
Unit 16: Operations and Project Management
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to develop students’ understanding of contemporary operations theory as a function of a modern organisation. Students explore key benchmarks and processes which will enable effective critique of an operation function. Students will also consider the fundamentals of project management utilising the prescribed, but well established, project life cycle.

On successful completion of this unit students will have developed sufficient knowledge and understanding of operations and project management to make an effective and immediate contribution to the way in which an organisation conducts its business. Students will also be in a strong position to contribute to, as well as lead, small-scale projects.

Underpinning all aspects of the content for this unit will be the consideration of the strategic role of operations management and planning and control of resources, and project management theories and the project life cycle.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Review and critique the effectiveness of operations management principles.
2 Apply the concept of continuous improvement in an operational context.
3 Apply the project life cycle (PLC) to a given context.
4 Review and critique the application of the PLC used in a given project.

515
17
Understanding and Leading Change
Unit 17: Understanding and Leading Change
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to prepare students to anticipate, plan and deliver organisational change. In addition students will be able to predetermine appropriate and timely interventions required to maximise the benefits and minimise the risk of organisational change.

On successful completion of this unit students will have developed sufficient knowledge and understanding of leadership in the context of organisational change to make an effective and immediate contribution to the way in which an organisation determines and responds to change drivers. Students will also be in a strong position to contribute to change initiatives as well as to consider the strategies required to change resistors.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Compare ways in which change impacts on an organisation’s strategy and operations.
2 Evaluate the influences that drivers of change have on organisational behaviour.
3 Determine how barriers to change influence leadership decision-making.
4 Apply a range of leadership approaches to a change initiative.

515
18
Global Business Environment
Unit 18: Global Business Environment
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to explore the wider position some organisations have in the global environment. Students will appreciate the complexities of operating in a global environment, and this will enable them to offer greater breadth and depth to an organisation’s current or aspirational global presence.

On successful completion of this unit students will have developed an understanding of the wider global environment in which organisations operate. This will enable students to add value to an organisation as they will be able to apply their knowledge in such a way that they could advise senior managers (in either large or small organisations) on global matters which they may not have ordinarily considered.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Analyse the key factors which drive globalisation.
2 Determine the strategic complexities associated with operating in a global environment.
3 Evaluate how operating in a global market influences an organisation’s structure, culture and functions.
4 Evaluate the influence of globalisation on organisational decision-making and strategy.

515
Two optional units at Level 5 which the College will choose from the list below
UnitUnit TitleUnit LevelUnit Credit
Optional unit32
Business Strategy
Unit 32: Business Strategy
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to develop students’ awareness of the different kinds of strategy which could be used in an operational, tactical or strategic role for an organisation. This will be underpinned by a thorough knowledge and understanding of the theories, models and concepts which could significantly support an organisation’s strategic choice and direction.

On successful completion of this unit students will have developed sufficient knowledge and understanding of strategy to make a positive, efficient and effective contribution to the development of business plans and operational direction. This could be in the role of a junior manager responsible for having a specific input into an organisation’s decision-making and planning.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Analyse the impact and influence which the macro environment has on an organisation and its business strategies.
2 Assess an organisation’s internal environment and capabilities.
3 Evaluate and apply the outcomes of an analysis using Porter’s Five Forces model to a given market sector.
4 Apply models, theories and concepts to assist with the understanding and interpretation of strategic directions available to an organisation.

515
35
Developing Individuals, Teams and Organisations
Unit 35: Developing Individuals, Teams and Organisations
Introduction

The aim of this unit is to provide students with the opportunity to appreciate that developing knowledge and skills to achieve high performance is a cross-organisation activity. Students will recognise that their own professional development is just one route to improving the performance of those teams and organisations in which they work. They will also gain an awareness of the context in which learning takes place and how development needs are linked to learning interventions aimed at supporting an organisation’s strategy.

On successful completion of this unit, students will have laid the foundations for their own continuing professional development which will support their future engagement in lifelong learning. They will also be able to contribute to the development of others and make a positive contribution to the sustainable growth of an organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Analyse employee knowledge, skills and behaviours required by HR professionals.
2 Analyse the factors to be considered when implementing and evaluating inclusive learning and development to drive sustainable business performance.
3 Apply knowledge and understanding to the ways in which high-performance working (HPW) contributes to employee engagement and competitive advantage.
4 Evaluate ways in which performance management, collaborative working and effective communication can support high-performance culture and commitment.

515
37
Consumer Behaviour and Insight
Unit 37: Consumer Behaviour and Insight
Introduction

This unit is designed to enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of the consumer’s decision-making processes, from needs recognition through research, the evaluation of alternatives, purchase and post-purchase evaluation. While students will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, they will also be expected to relate these to real-world examples, including their own personal experiences.
How do we buy products and services?
What motivates us to seek out a particular product or service?
What research do we undertake prior to making a decision?
Do we seek out other people’s opinions, perhaps through social media?
To what extent do other people’s opinions influence our own?
How do we feel after we have made the purchase?

These are the types of questions to which organisations seek to gain answers. An important part of marketing is understanding the processes behind how a consumer makes the decision to purchase a product and/or service. This is applicable as much to Business to Business (B2B) as it is to Business to Consumer (B2C).

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up in business independently or being employed by an organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Demonstrate the ability to map a path to purchase in a given category, including the decision-making process.
2 Evaluate appropriate forms of research to understand influences on the decision-making process (B2C and B2B).
3 Evaluate how marketers influence the different stages of the decision-making process (B2C and B2B).

515
42
Planning for Growth
Unit 42: Planning for Growth
Introduction

This unit provides students with an appreciation of how small and medium enterprises (SMEs) develop and grow. Students will learn about and apply techniques for identifying opportunities for growth, and appraise options for achieving growth, including via collaboration. Students will also learn about the sources of investment finance and consider how an SME attracts investors. They will gain an understanding of the options for SMEs in terms of exit or, for family businesses, succession, and be able to appreciate the importance of making informed choices when choosing routes to growth and have an understanding of the potential risks vs rewards involved with growth.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:
1 Analyse the key considerations SMEs should consider when evaluating growth opportunities.
2 Assess the various methods through which organisations access funding and when to use different types of funding.
3 Develop a business plan (including financials) and communicate how you intend scaling up a business.
4 Assess the various ways a small business owner can exit the business and the implications of each option.

515

 

7: Calculation of the overall qualification grade

The calculation of the overall qualification grade is based on the student’s performance in all units. Students are awarded a Pass, Merit or Distinction qualification grade using the points gained through all 120 credits, at Level 4 for the HNC or Level 5 for the HND, based on unit achievement. The overall qualification grade is calculated in the same way for the HNC and for the HND.

All units in valid combination must have been attempted for each qualification. All 120 credits count in calculating the grade (at each level, as applicable).

The overall qualification grade for the HND will be calculated based on student performance in Level 5 units only.

Units that have been attempted but not achieved, and subsequently granted compensation, will appear as ‘Unclassified’; i.e. a ‘U’ grade, on the student’s Notification of Performance, that is issued with the student certificate.

Points per credit

Pass: 4

Merit: 6

Distinction: 8

Point boundaries

GradePoint boundaries
Pass 420−599
Merit  600−839
Distinction 840 +
8: What employment and further study opportunities could these qualifications lead to?

Having a BTEC HNC/ HND in Business allows students to specialise by committing to specific career paths and progression routes to degree-level study.

On successful completion of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma, students can develop their careers in the business sector through:

  • Entering employment in job roles such as:
    • Business Manager
    • Business Development Manager
    • Business Advisor
    • Office Manager
  • Continuing existing employment
  • Linking with the appropriate Professional Body
  • Committing to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • Progressing to university.

Successful completion of the BTEC HND is equivalent to completing the first two years of a Business-related honours degree at a UK university. The qualification is recognised by Higher Education providers (eg. universities) as meeting admission requirements to many relevant business-related courses, including, for example:

  • BSc (Hons) in Business and Management
  • BA and BSc (Hons) in Business Studies
  • BSc (Hons) in International Management.

Students should always check the entry requirements for degree programmes at specific Higher Education providers where they wish to gain admission and ‘top-up’ their HND.

9: Entry requirements and admissions

The City College is required by Pearson to ensure that every student we enrol has a reasonable expectation of success on the programme. All applicants must be at least 18 years of age.

Applicants aged over 21 years at the start of their course and who have been out of education for at least three years are classed as ‘mature students’. The prior qualifications and/ or work experience of such applicants will be reviewed by the College to consider if their individual profile shows they have the potential to achieve the qualification. If we believe it does and all other requirements of the admissions process are met, such applicants may be enrolled.

For those who have recently been in education, the entry profile is likely to include one of the following:

  • A relevant BTEC Level 3 qualification
  • A GCE Advanced Level profile that demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject or adequate performance in more than one GCE subject. This profile is likely to be supported by GCSE grades A* to C and/or 9 to 4 (or equivalent) in subjects such as Maths and English
  • Other related Level 3 qualifications
  • An Access to Higher Education Diploma awarded by an approved further education institution
  • Related work experience
  • An international equivalent of the above.
10: Application process

All applicants must first submit all relevant documents in the following checklist to the College with a completed application form:

  • Completed Application form which has been signed at the back
  • Passport size photo
  • An up-to-date CV
  • Passport or other form of photo ID
  • Qualification certificates
  • Next of Kin/ emergency contact phone number and address
  • Proof of address which includes your full name and current address.

After all the documents have been checked, the applicant must sit an entry test as part of the admissions process. If the test is passed, applicants are invited for interview. After the interview, all components of the process are considered, and the student will be informed of the decision, normally within 48 hours.

11: English language ability for non-native speakers (not born in the UK)

Non-native English speakers who have not undertaken their final two years of schooling in English, must demonstrate capability in English at Level 2 (or equivalent) before being admitted to the programme. Equivalent grades to Level 2 include CEFR B2, PTE 51, and IELTS 5.5 (reading and writing must be at 5.5). After gaining admittance, such students are still encouraged to enrol on the Level 2 English course because it should still help with their HND study, career development or further study.

12: English language ability for non-native speakers who were taught in English for the final two years of school (or more)

Some applicants will not be native-speakers but will have studied the final two years of school in English (eg. those from West Africa). These applicants are also encouraged to enrol on the Level 2 English course, either as a useful refresher or because it should help with career development or further study (eg. university entrance).

Applicants will need to prove they have any qualifications claimed and that they studied in English. If any examination certificates have been lost, applicants should apply for new copies or provide a letter from their school/ college, or provide some other proof of their educational history, so the details can be verified.

13: English language ability for native speakers (born in UK)

All applicants are encouraged to enrol on the Level 2 English course, even if they already have an appropriate English qualification. This is because it is a good refresher course for those who have perhaps been away from education for a while, and because it should prove helpful with career development or further study (eg. university entrance). If they don’t have an English qualification or can’t prove what they claim, the same applies.

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Start On 17/09/2018
Duration HNC - 1 year
HND - 2 years
Level Certificate
Diploma
Price £6,000 / year

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